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Idi Amin: syphilic cannibal

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Idi Amin (1925–2003) was one of the most notorious of Africa’s post-independence dictators. A former heavyweight boxing champion in Uganda and a non-commissioned officer in the British Colonial Army there, Amin caught the attention of his superiors because of his efficient management of concentration camps in Kenya during the Mau Mau rebellion in the 1950s, where he earned the title of “The Strangler”. Because of his initial loyalty to the Western Governments and his strongly anti-communist stance, Amin was picked by the Western Governments to replace Milton Obote's Ugandan socialist/leftist government in a January 1971 coup. While in power, Amin earned a reputation as a “clown” in some circles in the West, but he was no joke at home. Amin brutalized his people with British and US military aid and with Israeli and CIA training of his troops. The body count of his friends, the clergy, soldiers, and ordinary Ugandans rose daily, but the West ignored his cruelty.

Idi Amin found his enemies tasty (i.e. cannibalism): "After his coup of his predecessor, Apollo Milton Obote, Amin rounded up the military leaders that did not support his coup, murdered them, decapitated them and sat their disembodied heads around the presidential dining table, scolding them for not supporting him, and taking bites of their flesh." In August 1972, Amin gave all Asians in Uganda 90 days to leave, sans their businesses of course. In the Autumn of 1972, as part of his "economic war", Amin nationalized 85 British-owned businesses. Although Israel had previously supplied Uganda with weapons, Amin expelled Israeli military advisers and turned to Libya and the Soviet Union for support. In 1973 the USA closed its embassy in Kampala, Uganda. By 1978, the number of Amin's supporters and close associates had shrunk significantly, and he faced increasing dissent from the populace within Uganda as the economy and infrastructure collapsed. In 1979, Amin's quest for more power led him to invade Tanzania. In retaliation, Amin was overthrown by an invading Tanzanian/Ugandan army. After Amin escaped from Uganda in 1979, he settled first in Libya and later in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Epilogue: Idi Amin brought bloody tragedy (e.g. the deaths of over 300,000 of his own citizens) and economic ruin to his country, yet he was never jailed. The Dora Bloch slaying loosened tongues in Israel and a doctor who had served in an Israeli medical aid team in Uganda told a newspaper correspondent in Tel Aviv: "It's no secret that Amin is suffering from the advanced stages of syphilis, which has caused brain damage". Amin was not a Satanist, Darwinist, or Atheist. Amin's crimes were not "Satanic crimes", since Amin was not a Satanist (Isaiah 45:7). The Presbyterian/Lutheran serial killer James Eagan Holmes was probably trying to imitate Amin.

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