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Human skulls donated to Goodwill: Skull of child especially disturbing

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The donation box at a Seattle Goodwill store held some very unusual items inside, three human skulls. Now the hunt is on to find the donor and more importantly, find the origin of these human skulls, especially one that is said to be the fragil skull of a Native American child, according to Seattle Weekly on July 9.

The medical examiner believes the two adult skulls were clearly used for specimens in a clinic or for educational purposes, but the third skull is that of a Native American child and law dictates that this skull must go back to the tribe for burial.

The fragile remains of the Native American child would not have been used for medical or teaching purposes. The medical examiner said that the skull must be “repatriated to its tribe of origin,” as this is the law, NewsMax reports today.

The medical examiner’s office has made an announcement asking for the person who donated the skulls to come forward without penalty. They want to speak to this person to trace the origin of all three skulls, but particularly the child’s skull.

They promise there will be no legal implications for stepping forward and answering the questions they have about the skulls. Because these are odd things to own, the medical examiner’s office is sure someone knows who donated the skulls and they would like anyone who knows anything at all about who made the donation to please call the King County Medical Examiner’s Office.

The skulls were donated in June to the Bellevue Goodwill at 14515 NE 20th St. in Bellevue, Washington. While skulls and complete skeletons are often used for the purpose of training and education, they are not an object you are should give away as a donation.

The medical examiner’s office took this opportunity to remind the public if they come across human bones or skulls buried or in a public place, they must call law enforcement. In this case where the two skulls used for medical purposed were donated, instead they should have been handed over to the medical examiner’s office for disposal.

When the Goodwill employees were sorting through the new donations and found the skulls, they realized that these were authentic human remains and followed the procedure of calling the medical examiner’s office.

All bones, even ones used for teaching and demonstration, should be handled with respect, reminds the medical examiner.

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