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How to use "NO" and mean it

I was traveling in another state when all I heard were these little brats that would not take no for an answer and they would not stop asking their parent or parents for whatever caught their attention. I really do like children, admittedly I prefer the polite, well mannered ones.

I must admit, to my dismay, out of my adult mouth straight to a temper tantrum throwing child I asked how old she was. The mother was thankful for the distraction, but quite honestly I was tired of listening to the child. The child acted as if she did not hear me and continued to throw her fit as the mom interrupted her saying I was talking to her

The girl responded to me. She was eight. My reaction shocked me and her. I said "Wow! You certainly do not act like an eight year old." The man behind the counter snickered and the mother just nodded in agreement. I told her her mother must be awful nice to allow her leniency. The girl was quiet for about five seconds and she studied me before she continued in on her mom.

From the conversation, she wanted a toy, her mom said no, then she grabbed her mom's phone, and called her dad, apparently waking him up. Then she told her mom that he said it was okay. The funniest thing was the mom did not believe her, and continued saying no until the daughter grabbed the phone from the mom's hand and called him again after being told not to.

I looked at my daughter and smiled. I told her how proud I am of her and her brother.She asked why and I said because if either of them ever acted like that I would put them up for adoption. I also realized in that moment of praise for my children, that I should not blame the child for her actions. Her parents trained her to act that way.

If you want your children to listen to you and respect your requests, you need to let them know you are serious. I have never hit either of my children and yet they both know what "no" means. If you want your child to obey "no" then make sure they know it doesn't mean maybe, or yes if the child keeps bugging you. Tell them no once or twice, maybe three times depending the age of the child, and let them know the conversation is over.