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How to handle an employee’s two-week resignation notice

When an employee resigns do you let them work out their notice or do you squish them like a bug?
When an employee resigns do you let them work out their notice or do you squish them like a bug?
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Handling a two week notice is as much about the employees that will be remaining on staff as it is about the employee that turned in the notice. How the employer handles it sets a tone that will impact all other employees.

Human resources professionals, the employee's supervisor and other members of the management team need to approach a two-week warning with much care. Some companies tend to walk the employee out as soon as they receive the notice while other employees are given the benefit of a transition period.

If an employee is terminated immediately upon tendering a resignation it sends a message to other employees not to be so considerate when they decide to move to a new position. Employees may even calculate that they should give their notice at the last possible moment so they may get the financial benefit of a company paying out their notice period.

Opponents of allowing an employee to work throughout their notice timeframe also cite the damage an employee can do during this time. Taking company files should not be consideration because the employee, if that was their mindset, would have done so before giving the notice. However care must be taken that they are not allowed to spread cancerous bad feelings about the supervisor or other management or the company in general.

Each resignation needs to be carefully considered and it is generally best to allow an employee to work throughout the resignation period even if it means reassigning them to isolated responsibilities far away from the rest of the team.

Whatever you decide be sure to limit the risks. The Best Ways CEOs can Minimize Risk when Terminating Employees by Margaret M. Pinkham is a valuable resource providing additional information about the legal impact of two-week notices.

©2014 Max Impact, used with permission.

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