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How to capture a force of nature

Same farm, just a little different angle, and the one with the snow is taken from the road. I was already cold, wet, and frozen. So I thought this one could be done from a distance.
Same farm, just a little different angle, and the one with the snow is taken from the road. I was already cold, wet, and frozen. So I thought this one could be done from a distance.

If when life gives you lemons you make lemonade, what then do you do when Mother Nature gives you 23 inches of snow? You take pictures of course… Try going back to a spot that you have shot before at a different time of day, a different season, a different angle. You might be surprised how much something can look so different, and yet so the same.

What a difference a season can bring. Farms are so beautiful to photograph.
Photo by: Elizabeth Steinhilber



Winter silhouettes on white
Mother Nature can be brutal, with temperatures so cold your skin begins to burn, and winds seem to cut through even the warmest coat, and did I mention 23 inches of snow? … Yet even with all of the fury that Mother Nature can bestow, when you view her through the camera’s eye somehow the brisk wind becomes like brush strokes on a painted canvas instead of wind ripping at your clothes, now it appears to be just directing motion. The cold temperatures present a crisp preciseness even for the best lenses which gives a captured image a better illusion of depth. Then there is the snow, what can I say about 23 inches of cold, heavy, wet precipitation? Well to start with it is cold, heavy, and wet… alright and it’s white, which makes it a perfect backdrop for all of the winter silhouettes against it. A simple tree that would ordinarily look dark and dormant without the blanket of snow, now stands out and comes to life in a three dimensional sort of way.




Location, location, location


The one thing to remember about a beautiful snow is the location of the snow. The city is great for taking pictures of lights, reflections, design and such, but in a very short time a beautiful covering of glittering white snow is turned into a very dark dirty mess. Road cleaning plows push the snow to the side of the road, and after the salt, sand, along with other snow melting chemicals, are added to the mix it just loses all luster, not to mention the demand for an ugly, slushy, snow photo of this nature is much less sought after. To capture a good quality, old fashioned, Mother Nature winter scene you might want to move out a little bit from Cincinnati. Twenty minutes from the Ohio River in any direction should do just fine. Give it a try. Keep in mind that when you are trying to capture a force of nature, consider the elements that you will be facing, and properly prepare yourself for the trip. First rule …safety, then photos…and in that order. Happy hunting fellow shutter snappers, and have fun!


 

Comments

  • CincyShutterbug 4 years ago

    great pics! you can tell it's the same place, but it looks so different. I think I know my what my next little project will be, thanks for the idea!

  • Annette Palmer - Cincinnati Holiday Examiner 4 years ago

    Very nice photography! Your pictures capture the feel of the season. The summer one looks "warm" and the winter looks "cold". I love the contrast in the black and white, definitely an eye catching shot!

  • C. Niples 4 years ago

    GREAT PICTURES!!!! I especially enjoy the "Tree of Light" picture. I have displayed it on my office wall and am seriously concidering getting it blown up and having it framed. THANKS!!