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How Law Enforcement Detects Breaches Before Victims Do

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Law enforcement agencies detect data breaches before businesses do because the former seeks evidence of the cyber crime, reports a networkworld.com article.

Unlike law enforcement agencies, businesses don’t go undercover in hacker forums. Nor do they get court permission to bust into enclaves of cyber thieves. Businesses don’t have moles. It continues: Law enforcement agencies interview imprisoned cyber crooks. The FBI does a lot of undercover work.

Law enforcement may then approach a company and say, “You’re being victimized; we have the evidence.” But often, the company may be skeptical of such a claim. Admittance means facing government response and upset customers

The law is always buffing up on its skills at fighting cybercrime to keep up with its evolution, such as a drastic decrease in solitary criminals and an increase in complex crime rings. These rings have all sorts of technical tricks up their sleeves, including hosting their own servers and changing up their communication methods to vex law enforcement. It doesn’t help that some foreign countries don’t place an emphasis on fighting cybercrime.

The evidence that the law presents to the business when that time comes is rock solid, though again, the company may lack aggression in its immediate response. The company’s legal counsel is commonly the first person to get the forensics report. Upper management usually gets involved before the IT department does. This is all part of keeping legal control over potentially harmful situation.

Robert Siciliano is an Identity Theft Expert to AllClear ID. He is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen See him knock’em dead in this identity theft prevention video. Disclosures.

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