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Hobby Lobby Holly receives death threats via social media

This image was posted to Twitter with the caption "How to make a liberal's head explode."
Holly Fisher

She knew what she was doing. She's been around in politics long enough to know that her actions would spark reactions. But when Holly Fisher posted a picture of herself in a pro-life t-shirt, holding a Chick-fil-a soda in front of Hobby Lobby, with the caption, ATTENTION LIBERALS: do NOT look at this picture. Your head will most likely explode," Fisher never anticipated death threats.

She told the Blaze, “One of first responses I got was from a guy who that said that he wanted to shove the Chick-fil-A cup down my throat.”

That was one of the nicer comments.

Supporters suggested the her picture was missing the American flag, a Bible and a gun. On July 4th, she provided that image.

She wrote, "Biggest complaint I'm getting about my #HobbyLobby pic is there's no gun, bible, or flag. Tried to make up for it."

Fisher told Inquisitr.com “I have always been extremely conservative and passionate about my views. The last few years of the growing hate and intolerance among the ‘tolerant’ left has made me want to stand up and speak out. I saw this as a perfect opportunity to show where I stand. I didn’t do it to try to change minds of those who disagree with me, but more so to show like-minded people that they’re not alone and it’s okay to stand up for what you believe in, even if it’s not popular right now. I want younger Americans to know it’s okay to not follow the current liberal path…”

The vulgar and violent responses kept coming. An Internet meme emerged that compared her Hamas jihadist suicide bomber Reem Riyasha.

Fisher noted that those who complain about the "War on Women" had no trouble insulting her via social media.

Michael Stone, who calls himself a progressive secular humanist writing at Patheos called Fisher the "New Face of American Taliban."

But Charles C.W. Cooke at The Corner at National Review, writes in response to Stone, "To sum up, then: Fisher’s “dangerous strand of Christian fundamentalism” is so extraordinarily “dangerous” that it has not only failed to engender any “real violence” but it can’t even bring itself to threaten harm? Goodness, let’s bring out the national guard."