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Hey Eastern Canada, How 'Bout Those Gas Prices?

It's not merely coming soon. It's already come to a gas station near you: record highs at the pump.

In Toronto, to buy a litre of gas today would cost you $1.409 -- in order words, practically $1.41 per litre. How you like that?

Don't get it twisted. This isn't someone from the heart of oil country taunting you about the price of gas. I don't consider there to be a whole lot to taunt anyone about. Out here fuel is $1.209 per litre -- in other words, practically $1.21 per litre. I may not like that very much when I fuel my truck, but I like it a whole lot better than I'd like $1.41.

So what's the deal?

Well, it's pretty complicated. One of the big factors driving the increase is what's happening in Iraq right now -- Al Qaida has pretty much turned vast portions of the country into an Islamofascist mosh pit. That hurts the supply of middle eastern oil -- or as I (and many others) call it, middle eastern conflict oil -- and drives up the price.

And while oil price isn't the sole driving factor of gas prices, it's a pretty big one.

So as debate over the Line 9 and Energy East pipelines heats up -- with the far-left determined to halt the two lines -- Ontarians (and Quebeckers) need to ask themselves a very important question:

Do you want your gasoline to continue to be made out of middle eastern conflict oil, with all the unsavory things it funds -- including terrorism and the oppression of women -- or from Western Canadian ethical oil? And not just because it's produced in a manner that is far more respectful of the environment, far more respectful for the well-being of workers, in a region where human rights actually carry value, where the local population actually gains great advantage from the sale of publicly-owned resources.

Not just for that: but because it's (for now) far cheaper to buy Canadian ethical oil than middle eastern conflict oil, and even when the per-barrel purchase price isn't, it will still be far less expensive to transport -- especially via pipeline.

Now think about this: you, the Ontarian consumer, have far more power to influence the Line 9 and Energy East decisions than the far-left cabal determined to sabotage it. There is far, far more of you than there are of them. In a democracy, that counts for something.

So the next time you fuel up, think about your choice. And choose wisely.