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Hawaii 'Revenge Porn' bill signed into law

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Gov. Neil Abercrombie signed into law, Hawaii State's "Revenge Porn' Bill. Effective June 20, 2014, the Revenge Porn law carries up to a five year jail term and constitutes a class C felony. The convicted felon is required to register as a sex offender.

Revenge Porn is defined as nude, pornographic or sexually explicit photos or a sex video, posted online by a perpetrator without the subject's consent.

Scores of websites started to surface giving ex-lovers a venue to post home made amateur sex videos of their ex-lovers. In some cases the poster used the name, address and phone number of the victim. The malicious intent of the poster is to seek revenge against their ex, by humiliation.

In Hawaii if nude or sexually explicit photos are taken using a "hidden camera," an additional misdemeanor charge would apply. Hawaii has a law pertaining to using a hidden camera in a private area where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy.

Human rights activist Kris Coffield, of the Imua Alliance told Hawaii News Now, "I feel great. It's a huge victory for victims of sexual assault. I think it's important to remember that revenge porn is sexual assault."

"Spreading somebody's naked image online for everybody to see without that person's permission is extremely abusive and traumatic for that victim" said Kathryn Xian of the Pacific Alliance to Stop Slavery.

State Representative John Mizuno said it was difficult to legislate, given it deals with the free speech issues. "However, if you're going to attack someone, affect their career, humiliate then, hurt them mentally, provide personal information about them, you're crossing the line," Mizuno said.

Nine other states have laws against revenge porn: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, Idaho, Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

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