Skip to main content

See also:

Hawaii death penalty case ends in life sentence without parole

Convicted killer Naeem Williams escaped death in Hawaii's first death penalty trial in almost 60-years. According to the June 27, report by CBS News, Williams' attorney John Philipsborn, said that Williams expected to be sentenced to death for the beating, torture, and murder of his then 5-year-old daughter, Talia Williams.

Williams was convicted of the child's murder on April 24, 2014. A deadlocked jury expressed great pains in deciding to render a decision to execute Williams. Ultimately the final decision in sparing Williams' life was left to U.S. District Judge J. Michael Seabright.

In a phone statement to the Associated Press, the child's birth mother Tarshia Williams, stated that she is relieved that the trial and sentencing is done, and she felt that Talia received justice. Williams also expressed concern for how her daughter's safety and welfare was overlooked on the numerous occurrences of domestic issues occurring in the home of Naeem Williams.

According to military police records, there were reports from neighbors of hearing the child screaming and crying. Military police responded on many occasions but no action was taken to protect or remove the child from the abusive home. Tarshia Williams is seeking monetary damages in her daughter's death.

Naeem Williams' wife and accomplice Delilah Williams, testified against her husband in exchange for a flat 20-year sentence. Williams confessed to duct-taping the child to a bed where she and Naeem beat the child. She also testified to the bone-crunching stomping of the child and slamming the 5-year-old against the wall.

Delilah Williams is requesting to serve her prison sentence outside of Hawaii. Naeem Williams is from South Carolina, and was stationed on Oahu at the time of the child's death. Williams has two other children.

Talia Williams' death happened on military property landing the case in Federal Court where the death penalty was permissible. Hawaii state abolished the death penalty in 1957.