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Guess what Facebook is planning to use drones, satellites, and lasers for?

Facebook plans to use Satellites, Lasers and Drones in spreading internet access
Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

When most Americans hear about the use of drones, lasers and satellites; NSA spying and listening in on conversations and terrorist search and destroy missions automatically comes to mind. But according to CNN, Facebook has another possibly more exciting technological purpose for the use of the devices. That’s because on Thursday, Mark Zuckerberg, Chief Executive for Facebook Inc, announced that he will be using all three devices as a way to increase internet access via social media all around the globe.

So instead of worrying about America’s spy networks trying to assess whether your phone calls or even email poses a national security threat, the drones will be utilizing technology to increase more connectivity in areas where access is limited or nonexistent. It is certainly ambitious and it is acknowledged by Zuckerberg, who mentioned in a statement that “Our goal with Internet.org is to make affordable access to basic internet services available to every person in the world.” This is important since at least two thirds of the world population does not have access to internet.

This appears to be the next frontier for global communication and Facebook is setting the bar even higher for other communication vehicles. In fact, they are so devoted to the idea that they have recruited experts from “the likes of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab and its Ames Research Center,” reported RT.

The social media giant has already had growing success with their current efforts to expand internet access around the world. The number of people accessing the internet has doubled in Paraguay and even the Philippines which have translated into 3 million more people accessing the internet.

When it comes to drones and non-military use who better for Facebook to partner with than Ascenta, which has developed Zephyr, which is the, longest flying solar-powered drone in the world according to RT.

So for those who may be looking up in the sky and see drones hovering do not automatically assume it is NSA watching you watching them. It may just be Facebook sending you a friend request from someone in the Philippines.

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