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Good luck or bad luck, why hockey players let beards grow during playoffs

Greg Zanon #4 of the Colorado Avalanche looks on during a break in the action against the Phoenix Coyotes at the Pepsi Center on February 11, 2013 in Denver.
Greg Zanon #4 of the Colorado Avalanche looks on during a break in the action against the Phoenix Coyotes at the Pepsi Center on February 11, 2013 in Denver.
Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

The Stanley Cup playoffs is an interesting time for National Hockey League players. Dating back to the New York Islanders successful bid to win the Stanley Cup in 1980 the tradition is practice in almost every level of hockey during playoffs seasons. Many feel it is good luck as they seek to emulate the championship season of the Long Island hockey team.

But what was it that really led to the Islander victory? The beards or the player’s talent?

Consider that 16 teams qualify for the NHL playoffs each year yet only one wins the Stanley Cup. One can quickly see that the beards were unlucky for 15 of the 16 teams!

Another indicator that the superstition surrounding the playoff beards is false comes from the 2014 Winter Olympics. Mike Babcock, head coach of the Detroit Red Wings, was selected to lead the Canadian hockey team. He made a role that beards would not be tolerated. Although some players had scruff the Canadian team won gold medals.

Superstitions in the business world also lead to false expectations. As with the talented New York Islander hockey team policies, procedures, and discipline are the key to success. Remember that 84% following the bearded superstition will end up defeated.

©2014 Max Impact, used with permission.

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