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'Gold Rush' discovers ‘Parker’s Take: Part 1’ on Discovery Channel

Parker and Grandpa John Schnabel of Gold Rush
Parker and Grandpa John Schnabel of Gold Rush
Photo courtesy of Discovery Channel used with permission

Last night’s episode of "Gold Rush" was titled “Parker’s Take,” and was narrated by Parker Schnabel, who gave fans more insight into what goes on during the filming of this amazing show. He also let fans know that a new season will be airing in October.

Last season ended for most of the miners, but Parker and Rick Ness wanted the one thousand-ounce season, and even got the swearing machine, Tony Beets to join them in their endeavor. As the recount begins, the weather report states that the temperature in Dawson City will be five degrees with evening temperatures around zero.

Parker resorted to thaw frozen dirt with a water monitor a few weeks before and ended the season with 836 ounces of gold, and the crew went home. Parker and Rick Ness stayed behind and decided that a thousand sounds so much better than the lower number. So the monitor was used to keep the wash plant running, until David Miller came by to take back the loaned monitor.

Now without the monitor, Scribner Creek was at a standstill. However, Parker never will give up. Rick reminded Parker about the pile of thawed paydirt that was near Little Blue before it gave up the ghost. Now the two had to move the wash plant, but it was not an easy task, and put a strain on the equipment. Two days passed and they ran 200 yards of dirt, but they found out that it was old tailings when Rick found a chain in the bucket.

Parker answered questions from viewers, and told Amanda that he still had his old Ugly Kid hoodie, and with the money he made last season, has not bought another one.

When they took the gold from the tailings, they found another 45 ounces, and a feeling of hopelessness came over them. With 119 ounces left to meet that magic number, Parker got a call from his mother telling him his grandfather was in the hospital, but the call was lost because of the remote location. Parker is torn between making the goal and maybe never seeing his grandfather alive again. He talked to Rick, and they discussed moving to a remote location on their map. Although Rick agreed, he knew it was pretty far, but it is his dream too. While there, Parker was digging and found pure white sand, and decided to see Tony and ask him what it meant?

Tony told Parker to check in town to see if anyone was looking for work, but no luck finding anyone to help. As Rick mans the operation while Parker is away, he nearly overturns the excavator. Tony told Parker the sand was a good-luck sign, and that everyone who found channel sand had good-luck finding gold. When Parker did a test pan, he found the best pan he had ever seen; a 50-color pan is a jackpot, when all they require is a 30-color pan to start digging. However, the weather is starting to be a major factor and if the water in the wash plant freezes, their season is over.

With just two guys working, Parker met with Tony and his wife Minnie. She knew someone who sits on their butt all day, and sent Tony to help the kid. Parker told the cameras, that although Tony is a big bad Viking, Minnie wears the pants in that house.

A woman sent a question to Parker; she has a 21-year-old daughter who needs a man with ambition – are you in? Emphatically, he answered no, and said, next question!

When Tony arrived, he asked Parker what he wanted him to do, and Parker told him to run the hoe. Tony asked him how much he was digging into the bedrock, and Tony told him to dig further. Rick was thrilled to see Tony help them, and Parker could not believe he told Tony what to do.

The next morning, Big Red was frozen over and looked like an ice castle. So they did what they could to melt what was in the sluice, and Parker took it home to pan it himself. When he arrived home, his mother and brother were there, but his father and grandfather would not be home until the next day. When his grandfather arrived, he knew that 881 was the total they had, and he waited until the whole family was there to weigh it. It weighed 1,029 ounces. His grandfather John never saw that much gold at once in his entire lifetime.