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'God's Not Dead' delivers authenticity to highs and lows of the Christian walk

"God's Not Dead" deals with the authentic issues of attempting to have God as a standard for moral principles.
"God's Not Dead" deals with the authentic issues of attempting to have God as a standard for moral principles.googleimages

“God’s Not Dead” does a marvelous job of delivering authenticity that anyone can identify with, a believable composite of the joy, sorrow, tragedy and triumph, real choices, and the sacrifices people of faith must decide while navigating through life.

http://www.examiner.com/article/god-s-not-dead-opens-today-christians-face-another-goliath

You are treated to a cross section of story lines involving everyday people from different cultures weighing the big question concerning God’s existence and the problems of merging the different value systems of society. The big issues of inclusion and tolerance are well sifted together.

The story is a plethora of real cases that have been filed against America’s colleges and universities that have routinely discriminated against people of faith that were legally exercising their religious rights. The genuine restrictions leveled against religious expression and the intolerance of those that direct religious prejudice are exposed by “God’s Not Dead”.

Education and indoctrination are two distinct practices presented in “God’s Not Dead”, something that is routinely missing in many religiously themed movies. The inconsistency of allowing absolutes when it is convenient, but not when discussing the existence of God is eloquently put to discussion.

The central theme of the intellectual college professor wanting to discuss religion from a presupposition of his own making offers a brutally honest approach in the debate between atheists and people of faith. There are several side stories in progress during the movie that ultimately intersects with the core message of “God’s Not Dead”.http://www.reasons.org/articles/personal-comments-on-gods-not-dead

This is the refreshing strength of “God’s Not Dead”. It presents the ultimate issue of morality and the limits God places to the expression of human behavior even though free will and the consequences of expressing free will are put squarely before the movie goer. Without the standards in place, anything is permissible.

This magnifies the spiritual truth articulated in the Bible that “everything is permitted, but everything is not expedient or good for you”. This cold hard fact is rarely put on the table during discussion.

The energetic “News Boys” make a brief appearance with their Christian hit “God’s Not Dead”, and run into one of the movie story lines involving a young woman facing a personal crisis in her life. The question of “what do you now have?” is effectively presented to her by the “News Boys” during a desperate time in her life she is left to deal with problem on her own.

As a reporter she has great doubts regarding another Christian entertainer from “Duck Dynasty” who recently had the consequences of expressing his faith run afoul in the entertainment industry. Simplicity does not mean lack of intelligence, and that message needed to be added to the equation. The typical stereotyping of the Christian wife being pregnant and barefoot is humorously presented.

Many frivolous derogatory prejudices regarding Christian expression and to people that believe in God are presented in “God’s Not Dead”. People of faith will clearly be able to identify with quite a few of them.

People that have rejected religion will also be able to see themselves and one tactic often used where discussion is not even allowed in their circles of influence. This issue comes up quite often in schools, socially, or at businesses public or private where discussion of religion is still taboo.

“God’s Not Dead” does an admirable job of putting religion on the table at least for discussion, and the mild persecution that takes place against people of faith that stand on the principles of their belief system.

Persecution in America is nothing like the wide spread suffering of Christians in foreign lands.

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/publiccatholic/2013/10/does-christian-persecution-exist/

http://america.aljazeera.com/opinions/2014/3/christians-persecutioncomplex.html

Those believing in God are not depicted as unrealistically good or unrealistically bad as in standard Hollywood type story lines. Believers in God face the same typical issues everyone has to address. There are no magical solutions.

The Bible advises followers that trials, tribulation, and persecution would take place should they follow Christ and that very warning is well presented as a potential pitfall in “God’s Not Dead”.

“God’s Not Dead” is a reminder that Christians are not perfect, just perfectly forgiven.