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German homeschool family allowed to stay after all

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Just one day after the U.S. Supreme Court denied a homeschool family’s appeal for asylum, just a few hours ago on March 4, 2014, The Home School Legal Defense Association, HSLDA, has confirmed that the Romeike family can stay in America. What a roller coaster 24 hours it has been!

Michael Farris, from HSLDA explained the decision:

The Department of Homeland Security verbally informed Home School Legal Defense Association that the Romeike family is being granted indefinite deferred action status. The Department told HSLDA that this meant the order of removal would not be acted on and that the Romeikes could stay.

In 2008, the family sought refuge from what they claimed was religious persecution from their homeland of Germany which was enforcing a Hitler-era law that forbids parents from educating their own children at home. A Tennessee court granted the family temporary asylum to freely live in Eastern Tennessee and continue to homeschool their children with a Christian worldview.

Of course, the family encountered legal twists and turns along with more drama than this quiet, God-fearing family probably ever dreamed was possible. They lived through nightmarish fear of having their children taken away from them as well as possible fines upon return to Germany as they continued to live out their lives, educating their children in the way they believe they are called to do, and they have even added children to their family since their original asylum was granted.

Watch the Romeike Story here.

After last night's decision that left the family facing deportation, a Fox News report announced the disapproval of other homeschoolers in the Romeike's state.

Tonight, the family can breathe a huge sigh of thankful relief. Along with their thanks, many concerned homeschoolers across the nation are joining in this victory that, just 24 hours ago, appeared to be a loss.

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