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Georgia SPCA: Dog Training and Behavior, Part 1

Hi, I'm Eskimo!
Hi, I'm Eskimo!
Georgia SPCA

Information provided in these articles is intended to provide some guidance for you and your pet. Not all animals behave (or respond) in the same manner. Should you have questions or concerns about anything you see here, please consult your veterinarian. While we work with vets on a regular basis, we are not veterinarians. We feel the articles here provide useful but general guidelines and suggestions for working with your pet. Please note, some articles may be disturbing to young children. Please preview articles to make sure they are appropriate for your child.

Mouthing

What is mouthing?
If you watch dogs play together, they often mouth each other in a sort of mock bite. Many dogs play with people in the same way — by mouthing our hands or other body parts. Though mouthing is not biting, it can become too aggressive to be acceptable.

The Canine Escape Artist

Is your dog escaping from the yard? Here are two reasons why this could be happening and some possible solutions to the problem:

Preventing Your Dog From Chasing the Cat

Chasing is a natural instinct for a dog, but it is not appropriate behavior in your home when directed toward your cat. The following guidelines can help you deal with this behavior through management (preventing the problem) and training (motivating the dog to change his behavior).

Submissive or Excitement Urination

Dogs sometimes resort to submissive urination when they don’t want to challenge someone that they perceive as dominant. Other dogs are prone to urinating when they become excited. The submissive urinators are often timid or young dogs who lack confidence in themselves. Submissive urination can be their response to intimidating encounters with either people or with other dogs.