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Gay animals: the newest type of LGBT family

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Can two male penguins raise a family? All signs point to yes. According to the recent article “Gay Penguins’ Role as Surrogate Parents,” posted on ITV.com, male penguins Jumbs and Kermit took over the parenting duties for a baby penguin abandoned by his mother and father. From the pre-hatching stage to birth, the couple did a remarkable job. They shared the incubation and feeding duties, impressing the staff at Wingham Wildlife Park.

This is not the first time two guy penguins fled the heterosexual nest. Male penguins Roy and Silo from Central Park’s Zoo attempted to raise a family together by trying to hatch a stone. Obviously unsuccessful, they were given a real egg, the two of them creating their own LGBT family. The couple’s heartwarming story can be found in the children’s book, “And Tango Makes Three,” by Justin Peterson and Peter Parnell.

Penguins are not the only animals to engage in same-sex activities and behaviors. Homosexuality is quite common in the animal kingdom with approximately 450 species of animals displaying love toward their own gender, as stated on LiveScience.com. The website also shared the following details about gay animals in its piece “Gay Animals: Alternative Lifestyles in the Wild.”

Macaques show evidence of lesbian and bisexual behavior. Female Macaques copulate with each other quite frequently, engaging in passionate, monogamous relationships. Males are also sexually involved with their own gender. However, males operate under a “love ‘em and leave ‘em” approach, engaging in one-night stands with other males.

Are big, hairy animals too afraid to come out of the closet? Not if you are a bison or an antelope. Most bison male mounting, over 50 percent, is performed with the same gender during mating season. On the flip side, antelopes exhibit more signs of lesbian behavior, two females copulating with one another a couple times per hour during prime time mating season.

Homosexual activity has also been reported in giraffes. Sex between males is more prevalent than heterosexual mating. The long-necked animals keep the romance alive, often initiating foreplay with other males via necking and kissing that leads to passionate mounting.

Even water cannot douse the flames of same-sex love, bottlenose dolphins enjoying the benefits of bisexuality. Using creative sexual methods, some of these water creatures shun the opposite sex at times, opting for periods of pure homosexual behavior. Gray whales are also privy to same sexual relations with each other. Walruses join in on the fun, male walruses often sleeping together, as well as embracing.

Some birds express an affinity for their own gender. Almost half of male Guianan Cocks get frisky with each other, some refusing to mate with females. Swans show that they have what it takes to be an LGBT family, a quarter of all swan families headed by lifelong gay couples.

Readers, what do you think about gay animals raising their young? Please leave a comment on my page.

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