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Future fitness and exercise sciences won't ignore adults, seniors and disabled

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Yesterday, March 3, 2014, the engineers from the Adult Exercise Efficiency Project, released a statement to examiner.com news, about the future of physical fitness, for average, older or mobility hindered adults.

The not for profit Adult Exercise Efficiency Project represents the first time that engineers have traced the paths and interactions of the forces from any muscle or cardio (stamina) exercise method, through the human body.

Engineering sciences applied to fitness, offer a new perspective for evaluating the efficiency of any physical exercise method that adults use. Here is their report:

"Almost every mobility motion (walking, running, jumping, climbing, dancing, etc.) humans have ever used drives almost all motion resistance energy into their skeletons, at the ankles".

"Similarly almost every motion people have ever used to lift or move things, also drives motion resistance energy into the skeleton, through the wrists".

"Since the ankles and wrists have always been the motion resistance entry points, when people started developing mobility, endurance and manipulation strengthening exercises, they were naturally based on doing the same motions that people already did, just harder, faster or for a longer duration".

"Today, besides beautiful fitness clubs, countless fitness devices, thousands of fitness and exercise science experts, and a gazillion times more information, those basic concepts for adult fitness and exercise science have not changed since before the dark ages".

"Almost all stout muscle and cardio (stamina) exercises experts teach adults and seniors, still shoves almost all of the motion resistance energy into their bodies, through their ankles or wrists, just as they did 3000 years ago".

"It is important to understand that motion resistance is the exercise force that causes new strength gains. Motion resistance forces the body to work harder, to create exercise".

"However stout motion resistance energy does not, cannot, and has never built a single gram of new muscle for anyone. It actually does the opposite, by damaging every part of the body that it overworks".

"The strength gains occur several days later, as the amazing design of the human body causes some of these overworked parts to rapidly heal bigger and stronger, so they can better handle with how they were heavily stressed".

"Today's fitness and exercise science remains stuck in the past because stout modern methods have always worked wonders for rapidly growing children and young adults up until their early twenties. So the assumption is that traditional exercise works the same for everyone at any age."

"While the skeleton is still developing (growing up) almost every loaded part of the body has the ability to rapidly heal bigger, stronger, and tougher after being overworked. But by the mid twenties, only the muscle systems continue that ability after being overworked".

"After the developing skeleton hardens into adulthood, joints and spinal disks can need several weeks or longer just to fully recover from being overworked".

The Adult Exercise Efficiency Project often sites a 2010 study from the University of Iowa* that indicates likely well below 1 percent of Americans over age 35, are physically fit. The study had no real explanation for such pathetic findings, but they claim mathematics exposes why.

"When the average adult uses modern fitness and exercise methods frequently enough to maintain powerful fitness, they have no choice but to prematurely wear out their joints and or spinal disks, thus explaining that 1 percent conclusion".

"It is obvious that only adult muscles and hearts need frequent stout exercise to maintain powerful fitness, but until modern fitness and exercise science starts using anything other than adult joints and spinal disks to oppose (fight, exercise) targeted muscle contractions, over 99 percent of older Americans will never know an option for becoming and remain powerfully fit".

After learning how to trace exercise forces through the human body, the project began designing new adult exercise methods that aim the motion resistance only in directions that cross the spine and extremity bones.

This new fitness and exercise science is called Aimed Resistance Force, or ARF for short. ARF uses anything other than bones, joints and spinal disks to oppose (fight) targeted muscle contractions, thus eliminating most of the problems with traditional exercise that prevent average, older and disabled adults from becoming powerfully fit and then staying that way for years to decades.

Because this is the first exercise and fitness science that will allow these people to exert their muscles far harder than older or hindered joints and disks can tolerate with traditional exercise, and do so painlessly, they are certain that ARF is the future of adult fitness and exercise science.

*The University of Iowa study determined that around 3.5 percent of Adults, 18 and over are physically fit. It is obvious that somewhere between 5-20 times as many young adults between age 18 and 35 are physically fit, than older adults between 36 and 120. So to be conservative, the Exercise Efficiency Project uses a 4 to 1 ratio.

At that ratio, 3.5 percent divided by 4, fewer than 1 percent of Americans over age 35 are physically fit, yet the real number is likely less than 1/2 percent.

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