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Fox News: Minimum wage increase is 'insulting,' tells people they are deficient

They say "it's the economy stupid." It sure seems to be and one of the subplots of current economic debate is raising the minimum wage so it becomes a living wage.

Protestors with the group 'Lift Up Oakland' stage a demonstration outside of the Oakland Chamber of Commerce on July 8, 2014 in Oakland, California.
Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The current federal minimum wage sits at $7.25 an hour and hasn't been increased since July of 2009, and those were based on laws put into place in 2007. President Obama has proposed an increase to $10.10 per hour, and others have even pushed to take the federal minimum wage to as high as $15 an hour. On Monday's "Fox and Friends" on Fox News, the topic of raising the minimum wage was brought up and the host Steve Doocy and Fox Business host Charles Payne lashed out it, calling it a "insulting."

Steve Doocy: To compare it to the Civil Rights Movement seems insulting.

Charles Payne: It really is insulting. It’s beyond the pale. Here’s one of those things that insults almost everybody. Obviously, it would insult anyone who was involved in the Civil Rights Movement, and also the workers.

Payne continued, claiming that increasing the minimum wage to a living wage of around $15 an hour only makes people feel like they have "deficiencies" that they can't ovecome.

"Essentially, I guess, what you are saying to these workers is, you were born this way, in a position where you can never better yourself, you can never get an education, you can never work on the side, you can never have the knowledge, you can never go out there and pool your money together and start a business...You are stuck in this because somehow you were born with deficiencies that you’ll only have a certain skill set, the minimum skill set.”

Payne even stated that minimum wage workers, such as those in the restaurant industry, feel entitled to certain rights. With a minimum wage remaining stagnant, unable to to keep up with the cost of living, minimum wage workers often find themselves receiving and relying on government subsides to make ends meet. By evening the playing field and making corporations pay their workers a fair wage, the government will no longer have to supply such a large amount of service to those who are putting in a full days work.