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Fox commentator tells poor people to 'stop being poor'

Fox Business correspondent told poor people to "stop being poor" in a Daily Show interview with Aasif Mandvi.
Fox Business correspondent told poor people to "stop being poor" in a Daily Show interview with Aasif Mandvi.
crooksandliars.com

According to Fox News Business correspondent Todd Wilemon, all that the poor need to do to uplift themselves from their plight is to "stop being poor." Wilemon's ill fated advice was provided last Thursday on the Daily Show with Aasif Mandvi, according to Huffngtonpost.com on Friday.

Wilemon also expressed that he believed that the poor are a "drain" to society and are at least partially responsible for the downfall of the economy. He claimed that America has the "best medical care" in the world. However, when confronted with the very depressing health care crisis in Tennessee by Mandvi, Wilemon's reply was that "some people do fall through the cracks."

Upon further investigation, it turned out that the United States ranks thirty-seventh in health care in the world, falling between the countries of Costa Rica and Slovenia.

Wilemon expressed his belief that the United States will descend to "Third World country" status if Obamcare is allowed to come to fruition. Wilemon stated that Obamacare will result in long lines and little choice for Americans.

When Mandvi asked Wilemon what he suggested as a solution for people who could not afford to pay for health care, Wilemon said, “If you’re poor, just stop being poor.”

This commentator is confident that if they possibly could do so, the poor would stop being poor without any semblance of hesitation. If the poor could end the recession and its resultant downward spiral, they would do so. If the poor could bring back the jobs that have been outsourced to other countries, they would do so immediately. If the poor could make banks and businesses lucrative again so that they could loan money again, they would do so.

If the poor could make it easier for average Americans to qualify for home loans, business loans and government jobs programs, they would do so. Finally, and without equivocation, if the poor could stop being poor, they would do so in a heartbeat.

This commentator would like to make a suggestion to Mr. Wilemon: Stop being so insensitive to the poor and their needs. Stop listening to your colleagues at FOX News and other people who have never known or experienced the struggles and hardships that are shared by the poor. Start listening to those who have experienced poverty, struggled from paycheck to paycheck, and bounced their money from one account to another just to prevent their checks from bouncing.

Most importantly, Mr. Wilemon, start listening to your heart, to your sensitivity towards others, to your inner conscience and sense of compassion towards others. You may be very surprised to find that poverty is an inescapable trap from which even the most cunning may not be able to escape. You may find that the blame for poverty is not to be weighted upon the victims of poverty, but is something that is reflective of our larger society and its ineffective financial and public institutions and outsourced jobs.