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Former Hughestown police officer indicted on federal illegal drug sales

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The Federal Bureau of Investigation, Philadelphia division, announced today that a police officer with the Hughestown Borough Police Department has been indicted on selling oxycodone on separate incidents while in uniform. According to the FBI, Robert F. Evans, Jr., age 38, Moosic, Pennsylvania, has been charged with distributing oxycodone on between the dates August 2012 to July 29, 2013. According to court records, Evans stated that he distributed Oxycodone 15 mg and 30 mg pills and that he had sold the drugs least twelve times over the last twelve months. Evans also stated that he was on duty as a police officer and in uniform at least two or three of the times he distributed Oxycodone pills. The former police officer made an appearance in United States District Court, Middle District of Pennsylvania, Scranton, at 1:00 p.m. today.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Pennsylvania State Police worked together in the investigation according to United States Attorney Peter Smith. In the arrest warrant it was stated that Evans admitted, “, “I dealt pills with a gun on my hip.” The arrest warrant also states that Evans, while on duty admitted that he gave rides to known drug users to pick up illegal drugs from known dealers on River Street in Wilkes-Barre.

Philadelphia Division Special Agent in Charge Edward J. Hanko made the announced that the guidelines for sentencing are: “the maximum penalty under the federal statute is twenty years’ imprisonment, a term of supervised release following imprisonment, and a fine. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the Judge is also required to consider and weigh a number of factors, including the nature, circumstances and seriousness of the offense; the history and characteristics of the defendant; and the need to punish the defendant, protect the public and provide for the defendant’s educational, vocational and medical needs. For these reasons, the statutory maximum penalty for the offense is not an accurate indicator of the potential sentence for a specific defendant.”

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