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Flight 370 families told 'go home': Bay of Bengal plane wreckage found, ignored

Flight 370 families told to go home, the hotels and centers closing for them.
Flight 370 families told to go home, the hotels and centers closing for them.
Photo by How Foo Yeen/Getty Images

The Malaysian Airline officials held a debriefing for the families of Flight 370 today and basically told them to all go home. They had nothing new to report to these families, with the majority of the families being from China. They just reiterated old information and promised to put tighter controls over monitoring planes in the air, according to CBS News on May 1.

When the airlines told the families it was time to go and vacate the accommodations that the airlines had supplied for the relatives, screams and wailing started immediately. The already distraught families were thrown into a deeper pit of despair when asked to go home, according to CNN News today.

New information was made public yesterday about a geological survey company from Australia discovering the wreckage of a commercial airliner in the Bay of Bengal. They found this wreckage through images they create by using data showing the concentration of certain metals and elements in one specific location.

The company, GeoResonance, passed this information on weeks ago to the authorities in charge of the investigation. They left numerous phone and email messages, but their attempts to contact the people in charge of the search went unanswered.

The presence of these materials formed an image of a commercial airliner on the bottom of the bay bed, but search authorities dismiss that location. They said this is not a possible location for the downed aircraft.

When the joint international team finally addressed the data that the Australian company was trying to convey to them, their reply was simply that they are convinced they are looking in the right place for the downed flight. They believe the ill-fated flight went down in the southern Indian Ocean, not thousands of miles away in the Bay of Bengal.

The Bay of Bengal was one of the first places that the authorities thought the plane could have crashed, but the pings from the satellite pointed them in the direction of the southern Indian Ocean. They abandoned their search in the “northern corridor,” which included the Bay of Bengal. This was one of two corridors that were first believed to be a final route possibility for the downed plane. The second being the corridor which brought them to the southern Indian Ocean.

Along with telling the families that they must vacate the accommodations by Friday that were provided to them during this search, the authorities also gave the information on the search timeline. It took the Malaysian government four hours once the plane fell off the radar to launch a search. Vietnam reported the plane missing 17 minutes after it fell off the radar.

When the families were told to go home, it was done so with their comfort in mind conveyed the Malaysian Airlines. They want the families in the comfort of their own homes with their family around for support as the search continues. As soon as the families were given the proverbial boot, the wailing began.

Distraught families waiting for news of their missing loved ones do not want to leave. Fox News live reminded their viewers today that many of these families live in remote Chinese villages with very little or no Internet connection, TV or other means of news connections with the outside world.

Staying near to the center of the search operation gave them the comfort that they would know something as soon as something had been found. They also fear that when they go home there will be no one there to remind them of how important this search is to the families.

It also sounds as if they are worried that the search will eventually fall by the wayside without the families there for a constant reminder. It has been over a month of searching for this plane and the families have been supporting one another, which will also come to a screeching halt when the families disperse to their individual homes.