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First Steps Toward Balance:

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There is no longer any question about the horrific impact varying degrees of stress can have on our all-to-fragile human system. There are experts such as Drs. Lyle H. Miller and Alma Dell Smith, two people who have dedicated their professional lives to the measurement, analysis, and treatment of stress and stress-related ailments and complaints and many others, who can vouch for both the subtle and not so subtle impact that various forms and degrees of stress can have on those most susceptible and overtaken by stress.

In most of these cases, references are made to the emotional/psychological effects of stress and talks about anxiety and how people who are under a lot of stress, physiologically suffer negative impact on blood pressure, aches and pains (very commonly head pain), heart palpitations (leading to heart problems), and possibly even more damaging long-term effects.

And it is very clear and quite easy to understand the direct correlation between change (especially quick changes) and stress. For almost all of us, whenever things happen to cause high degrees of change in short periods of time, the level of stress experienced increases dramatically. And, this makes sense and can be exhibited by the endless supply of advice we are given by those around us to 'slow down' and 'not move too quickly' through upsetting events. We are advised to 'count to 10' so that our feelings of anger and hurt don't overtake us and we lose balance with rational thought and our over-burdened emotions.

We are taught repeatedly in our life lessons that it is smart to 'give things time' or to 'sleep on it' and 'let it simmer' before making any major decisions that will cause a major change. Very few of us go through life without being told by those closest to us 'don't rock the boat' or 'take your time'. We humans tend to avoid major change...especially when it occurs quickly. We avoid it and advise our loved ones to do the same. Too much change makes us feel nervous and tense. We like our changes in small, digestible doses.

Perhaps one of the most tumultuous times in our humans lives when things change very quickly (whether we want them to or not) is during the period of time we refer to as adolescence:

* Bodies grow and develop, for some practically overnight

* Hormones that we may never knew we possessed, run rampantly through our system - causing emotions to seem like an open mine field

* Social expectations and pressures play havoc even with those with even the most sturdy and consistent of upbringings

And that is just a brief introduction to some of the landscape of the adolescent portrait.

We can start by adding a dose of understanding to our teenagers. Knowing and realizing just how 'at risk' children in the 13-19 age range are, (emotionally, physically, psychologically and socially) can be a wonderful place to start in helping them (and you as the adult who cares the most about them) restore some extremely-needed balance.

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