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First Lady Michelle Obama dishes on diets and workouts with Rachael Ray

Find out about the First Lady's views on diets.
Find out about the First Lady's views on diets.Win McNamee/Getty Images

Some First Ladies became famed for their fabulous fashions, while others specialized in staying one step behind their famous spouses. But from her first day in the White House, First Lady Michelle Obama focused on promoting healthy lifestyles. Joining Rachael Ray on March 5, the First Lady dished on her own passion for working out and her views on dieting.

The First Lady confessed that she didn't always have a healthy diet. As a child, two specific foods made her recoil: Brussels sprouts and liver.

Now, however, she urges everyone to eat fresh foods. The First Lady is an advocate of creating family gardens, and even took that message to the White House. She's written about her campaign for garden-fresh diets in "American Grown: The Story of the White House Kitchen Garden and Gardens Across America" (click for details).

When it comes to working out, she has a favorite workout song: "I love Pharrell's 'Happy.'It’s just such a happy song. I mean, it literally makes you happy."

Although her daughters don't work out with her, the First Lady makes sure that they exercise at school. And she and President Obama both seek to "lead by example."

"We’re blessed to have our kids in a school system where they play sports and they have PE," she explained.

On vacations, the family goes hiking as much as possible, she added.

All the kids are old enough now where going on hikes is a really fun family thing. You’re out in nature, you get to hear what’s going on in your kids’ lives, so the older they get, the more we can do that together.

As for promoting fitness and healthy living to families across the nation, her "Let's Move" initiative recently celebrated its fourth anniversary. The First Lady has been activate in implementing the proposed updates to the Nutrition Facts label, so that it will highlight diet elements such as calories, serving sizes and added sugars.