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Fescue lawn overseeding Part 1: Atlanta lawns

The days are still hot, but with cooler mornings and evenings, get ready Atlanta:  the fescue lawn turfgrass overseeding season will be here soon.  We are almost into the ideal time to begin aerating and overseeding fescue lawns or Metro Atlanta and North Georgia.  I will present the things you need to do in a multi-part series. 

The ideal overseeding season lasts about 6 weeks, however, No Worries, there are other good, if not ideal timeframes to get this task done.
 

At this point, we have some time, so there are a few preliminary tasks to get done:

1.  Evaluate the condition of your lawn.  This summer was especially brutal, and fescue lawns were hit by heat, fungus, lack of rain, high humidity.  How much of your lawn is acutally desirable lawn grass?  If it is hovering around 50% or less, you may consider a more extensive renovation or replacement.  Above 50% and aeration & overseeding may be adequate.

2.  What does you soil look like?  North Georgia soils tend to be nutrient deficient.  Couple that with erosion, soil depletion, and poor grading practices, and you have very tough conditions for root development.  Is your soil sandy, brick hard, or rocky?  If so, you may want to consider topdressing with some organic matter.  We'll discuss these later.

3.  Get a soil test done!  Your county extension office will test your soil for your specific applications, e.g. lawn, vegetable garden, planting beds.  They will tell you exactly what amounts of nutrients need to be replenished.

Get these done now to be ready to go for the actual overseeding season.

Check out my resource page for more good info.

Abdurrahim is the lead designer at metro-Atlanta based, award-winning Proudland Landscape, LLC.
You can contact him with question via email at arjalal@proudlandlandscape.com.
Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/Proudland.
Also, check our Facebook fan page facebook.com/ProudLandscape

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