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FBI missing plane investigation: FBI probe due to pilot's bizarre cockpit moves

The FBI has been given the task of going over the deleted files of the missing plane pilot's flight simulator. Any recovered files that the FBI can produce is an important piece to the missing plane’s investigation, according to ABC News on March 20.

Missing plane FBI investigation centers on deleted files on flight simulator.
FBI.gov

To cover all bases, the investigation into the missing plane is taking an in-depth look at the pilot and co-pilot today. With all the evidence that has been uncovered so far, investigators do know that the automatic pilot computer was keyed in by someone in the cockpit to fly off the original flight plan.

This was done about 12 minutes before the plane dropped off radar. The two transponders were manually shut off by someone in the cockpit. They were not shut off at the same time, but minutes apart. This suggests that there wasn’t a fire or explosion in the cockpit at the time, or both would have been knocked off at the same time.

The investigation is looking into the pilots, as they were the ones in the cockpit when this was going on. The co-pilot’s last words were, “all right, good-night” to the air traffic controller. At this time they had already changed the autopilot and never mentioned this to the air traffic controller.

They were turning back but never said a word about it to the air traffic controller on the other end. What the investigators are looking for in any files that the FBI may recover is if the pilot was practicing any of the maneuvers that were done by the plane. This would include zooming to 45,000-feet and then coming back down quickly.

They also want to know if there are any runways in the remote areas where the plane went missing that the pilot might have practiced landing on with the simulator. With the FBI’s help, these clues they are looking for may be revealed if they do recover the deleted files on the flight simulator computer.