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Fantasy Football Draft Guide: fantasy magazines are worthless

Wait, who?
Wait, who?
Photo by Bryan Steffy

Fantasy Football magazines typically come out in July. That means they were likely published in June, and the material contained within them was written in May. If, by the time your draft rolls around, in August, you are relying on four-month-old information, you not only wasted the eight dollars you spent on the magazine, but you're about to flush your league fees.

No one is faulting the magazine contributors, except, perhaps those whose experts influenced them to take one more chance on Darren McFadden. The print pundits are doing the best they can. They're simply shackled by aged information. It's why most fantasy owners, and writers, those concerned with their reputation, are turning to the internet.

Were it not for celebrity nonsense, social media and pornography, fantasy sports would represent a serious portion of misspent time online. As such, fantasy football is a harmless, even worthwhile way to spend the time you're supposed to be working.

There are a wealth of helpful, even insightful sites out there. ESPN, naturally is the most comprehensive. The legendary (I said it) Matthew Berry delicately treads the fine line between being marginally helpful and extremely entertaining. For every dubious Michael Vick blunder, there are dozens of amusing tales about vultures and Seinfeld. Any "expert" can tell you to draft Peyton Manning. How many have ever made you tear up bringing you deep inside their own Thanksgiving?

You one of those people who won't buy a Kindle? Someone who just likes to bring a highlighted armload of research with them on draft day? Well, you own a printer don't you? Download a cheat sheet or two as your draft approaches. See how much better you do when you don't draft this year's Michael Crabtree.

Follow the San Diego Fantasy Football Examiner's indispensable snark all year long, or at least until he bashes your favorite team.