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Rising Star Eric Biddines Speaks on New Album, Working With Paul White

Eric Biddines
Eric Biddines
mtv

It's been a prosperous year for Florida MC/crooner Eric Biddines thus far. With the independent success of his latest album Planet Coffee Bean 2 still building Eric linked up with Maybach Music's go-to video director Ryan Snyder and the two have already created five visuals, bolstering the "Railroads Down" rapper's popularity even further.

Never one to sit still, Eric is already working on a deluxe edition of the breakout album, which will be remastered and will feature unreleased material, as well as his next LP, Elephant Wings which is set to drop later this year. To top it all off Eric took his talents international with a trip to London where he linked up with venerable musician Paul White for some songs that will be coming out under the moniker Golden Rules.

In an exclusive interview with Examiner.com, Eric opens up about his new projects, meeting Danny Brown and his long term vision.

Examiner: Planet Coffee Bean 2 is still gaining momentum from the videos you released. Are you making more videos or moving on to the next project?

Eric Biddines: We got some situations going on with some distributors that wanna re-release Planet Coffee Bean 2 because it's still new to a lot of people and I guess they saw the potential. Me and (PR specialist) Richie Abbott we're working out some logistics. But for right now we're looking to roll out some more visuals. So much revolves around the project. We just need to solidify what direction we're going and before we move on to the next project, Elephant Wings, which is pretty much done, we wanna take a step back and try to squeeze as much lemonade out of Planet Coffee Bean 2 as possible.

Examiner: Before the next one you said you planned on dropping a deluxe edition. Will there be any unreleased material on that?

EB: We're gonna add about 4-5 new songs. It'll be remastered so it sounds better. There's gonna be a new cover, which I created myself, and we'll probably drop a few limited edition physical copies. We also want to add a set of new visuals. The song, "Message In A Bottle" is a different version on the deluxe edition. This one will have a rap verse at the end. and we have a video for that that we're gonna reintroduce. "Lay In You" is gonna be the next video we're gonna shoot and I still wanna do videos for "Stripper Documentary" and maybe "2's and 4's." It's gonna be a real extension of Planet Coffee Bean 2. We're going on the 5th visual so we might do a DVD documentary to connect everything because we're packaging it as a new project to the masses.

Examiner: Talk about your evolution from PCB2 to Elephant Wings.

EB: After the creation of Planet Coffee Bean 2 you start to see what can perform well live, which was something I never even thought about. I made a lot of songs that are nice to listen to, that are good to vibe to or that may even work at radio but wouldn't necessarily work on the stage performance. Maybe the energy is missing. Maybe cause it's a certain beat or tempo. I have a distinctive crowd I draw in. Sometimes expectations are different on other people's tours, like I did some dates with Danny Brown. Danny Brown's crowd is totally different. They're expecting to have a certain level of energy. So on Elephant Wings the biggest difference I'd say I'm really trying to focus on songs that are good to perform and that was the biggest difference.

Examiner: You went to London last year. Can you talk about some of the work you put down while you were over there?

EB: I went out there for a week last October. I actually linked up with Paul White in London. We got an album that we did. Together we call ourselves Golden Rules. We ended up just vibin' on some songs and it turned into a full album, and then from there it turned into labels wanting to pick it up. We got some top names out there in London's hip hop scene working with us as well. I can't say who but I'm excited.

Examiner: You mentioned that you recently opened up a few shows for Danny Brown. Did you guys get to talk at all?

EB: The third date in we got to really vibe out because the dressing rooms were separated so the first two dates I didn't even see him other than being on the stage. Then the third one we chilled backstage and, I don't smoke or drink and he slowed down on all that too but he was back there burning with some of my buddies. He was by himself. It was him, a manager and a DJ. I was surprised normally you hear about rappers having these huge entourages but it was just three of them eating cheese pizza everyday. All he had on his rider was pizza and juice (laughs). But he was real dope. He's been working on his cardio, riding a bike and getting his health right because it's a lot of work being on the road it's exhausting you could see it in his face. He didn't even really know of me cause I got on the dates through his management and the agency. So the first day his room was right under the stage so he heard the performance and he liked how I opened up. He told me, "I heard you had it bangin' the first night so I'ma check you out again."

Examiner: On pretty much all of your work you don't have too many features. Is that a conscious decision or just how it winds up shaking out?

EB: I think some people limit how far they can go by collaborating with certain acts or too many acts. Like you got Chance The Rapper and with him you see some collaborations but it was no alignment. He didn't directly align himself with the TDEs or the Jon Conners, but then you had other people that did align themselves that it's like you can only get as big as the people you aligned yourself with. It's like high school. You get in and start hanging with the quarterbacks and you're automatically popular. You can only go down from there. I think a lot of people did it correctly like Kendrick Lamar. He wasn't very feature-heavy. It was his circle and that's it. If it wasn't his circle it was somebody big like Drake or Dr. Dre so I turned down some features just because I didn't want it to put me in a box.