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Egyptian leader El-Sisi calls for Islamic reform

According to Ryan Mauro, at the Clarion Project, “Egypt's El-Sisi Boldly Calls For Islamic Reformation.

A fellow and graduate of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism in New York, Ebrahim also holds an honours degree in Middle Eastern History and International Relations from the University of Toronto.
A fellow and graduate of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism in New York, Ebrahim also holds an honours degree in Middle Eastern History and International Relations from the University of Toronto.
www.salimahyebrahim.com

Abdel Fattah Saeed Hussein Khalil el-Sisi:

“commonly known as Mushir Sisi, born 19 November 1954, is an Egyptian Field Marshal who has been Commander-in-Chief of the Egyptian Armed Forces, as well as Minister of Defence, since 12 August 2012. As head of the armed forces, he played the leading role in ousting Islamist President Mohamed Morsi, following mass protests against Morsi and his government. El-Sisi was subsequently appointed as First Deputy Prime Minister, while remaining Minister of Defense.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abdel_Fattah_el-Sisi

Islam, said El-Sisi needs a modern understanding and should not rely on a discourse that has not changed for 800 years.”

The Clarion Project

Bear in mind that he is the military leader who booting Morsi from office in a coup.

The struggle is an ideological one within Islam. Islamic scholars cannot solve the problem because they are the problem. He alleged that violence and destruction has been committed in the name of Islam and that is wrong.

Of course, we in the West like hearing these words, but how are they being received in Egypt among the broad population?

The Clarion Project points to the military having a 70% approval rating. The Muslim Brotherhood has a 34% rating.

The Clarion Project is biased, of course. To balance that consider this alternative from Almontor.

“Egypt's Presidential Front-Runner Takes a Hard Line on Israel

Although Amr Moussa has not yet been elected president of Egypt, his anti-Israeli rhetoric has already assumed a large role in Egyptian politics. At the beginning of last week, Egypt’s provisional government announced that it was cancelling the gas agreement between Israel and Egypt. Thus one of the clauses in Moussa’s political platform was realized: a re-examination of the gas agreement between the two countries. Amr Moussa, who served as Egypt’s foreign minister and secretary general of the Arab League, is considered one of the leading contenders in the Egyptian presidential race.

“If Moussa will be elected president, he is likely to operate against us in ways we have not yet seen,” warns Professor Yoram Meital from Ben Gurion University of the Negev. “As far as he is concerned, the peace agreement between Israel and Egypt is not holy and changes can be made to it — such as increasing the Egyptian military presence in Sinai. He is likely to heap scathing, relentless criticism on Israel with everything connected to the Palestinian issue, to downgrade the diplomatic relations between the two countries and transmit civil aid to Hamas in the Gaza Strip — things we have not seen in the past.”

Read more: http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/politics/2012/05/no-friend-of-ours.html#?v=1362363401000?#ixzz2ruXpEICl

What do Egyptian people believe and want? According to DoSomething.org:

“The Middle East’s 100 million youth make up the majority of countries like Egypt and Iraq, yet in many of these countries they’ve lived under successive repressive governments that have stripped away their most basic rights and the opportunity to elect their leaders. They’re looking to have their voices heard on issues that so directly impact their future, like the environment, jobs, and the rights of women and girls.”

http://www.dosomething.org/news/egyptian-young-people-want-what-all-young-people-want

Salimah Yvette Ebrahim says,

“It is not about a single religion or a war with Islam; it’s about basic freedoms, about politics and economics. Many Egyptians suffer from abject poverty and live on less than $2 a day. Young people are at the frontline of these challenges, which in recent years have included massive unemployment rates, rising food prices, a lack of freedom of speech, and basic access to healthcare.”

DoSomething.org

Well, why isn’t she running for President of Egypt? It is because she is Canadian, and not Egyptian.

“Degrees in Middle Eastern, Islamic History and Canadian Studies and International Relations, Trinity College, Canada. Formerly with major international news outlets including: CBC Television; The Globe; The Mail; The Cairo Times; Biography Channel, A&E, documenting global politics, youth movements, environmental security challenges in Africa; international G8 and G20 summitry in Italy, Canada, France and Russia; war in Iraq; 2008 US presidential campaign. Co-Founder, Spirit Bear Youth Coalition; Co-Executive Producer, The Spirit Bear. Recipient of awards.”

http://www.weforum.org/young-global-leaders/salimah-yvette-ebrahim/index.html?link=no