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Ebola: The start of a new timeline

As we sit holding our mobile devices, glaring at our flat screens invisibly tethered to satellite dishes, and collectively watching: We have become witnesses to just how fast and far a terrifyingly debilitating virus can travel.

NEW YORK - AUGUST 04:  The American Flag stands.  Photo taken in the emergency room at Mount Sinai Hospital.  Doctors at the Manhattan-located hospital were reportedly testing a man, recently returned from West Africa, for the Ebola virus.
NEW YORK - AUGUST 04: The American Flag stands. Photo taken in the emergency room at Mount Sinai Hospital. Doctors at the Manhattan-located hospital were reportedly testing a man, recently returned from West Africa, for the Ebola virus.
Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images
UNDATED:  In this handout from the Center for Disease Control (CDC), a colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Ebola virus is seen.
Photo by Handout/Getty Images

Historically, Ebola has had an endemic hold in isolated communities very similar to Liberia, Guinea, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. Its track record or timeline meant a death sentence. Since the victims and their families did not travel far and few were invited (or too afraid) to go in, the person-to-person contact was limited or halted, so the chain of infection had an easier chance of being controlled and broken.

Fast forward to 2014: Now that we’re well beyond the industrial age and the global markets are greatly established and open, Ebola is no longer an inconvenience just for international explorers and travelers. Ebola has certainly taken an economic toll on the airlines and the drilling industries in West Africa. It has also impacted various other countries, like ours, because we are actively engaged in efforts to control and contain it. Yes, we even deal with this on our own soil.

The good thing about this new timeline is that West Africa is not alone. It has international support; and it will have a better chance of putting this round of the Ebola virus behind it. It also has a chance to hear that We mourn the loss of the nearly 1,000 lives lost to the Ebola virus and our hearts go out to the loved ones left behind.

The other good thing about the new timeline of Ebola is we now have:

Right now, there doesn't seem to be a clear end to the story, but we can rest assured that there is an international response to preventing any more deaths.

To read about the risk levels in St. Louis, click here (CBS local news).

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