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E-cigarettes are not associated with more smokers quitting: Liquid nicotine

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E-cigarettes are not associated with more smokers quitting, reduced consumption. Too many high-school students are being lured into smoking by names such as “hookah pens,” “e-hookahs” or “vape pipes,” according to the NY Times article, "E-Cigarettes, by Other Names, Lure Young and Worry Experts."

And too many young children, usually toddlers or preschool age kids are poisoning themselves by drinking the brightly colored e-cigarette nicotine liquids their parents use to refill e-cigarettes, according to the NY Times article, "Selling a Poison by the Barrel: Liquid Nicotine for E-Cigarettes."

The NY Times article explains that toxicologists warn that e-liquids pose a significant risk to public health, particularly to children. Liquid nicotine also can be absorbed through the skin and poison someone that way as well as swallowing, even if diluted.

You may wish to check out the March 24, 2014 video with the NY Times article, "Video: The Science and Future of E-Cigarettes." In the NY Times article, evidence is presented of the emerging dangers of e-liquids.

When liquid nicotine is perfumed with fragrant chocolate, cherry, and bubble gum flavors and bright colors, kids are drawn to the liquid

It's toxic, and can be fatal to children if swallowed or absorbed by the skin if it gets on the hands or other parts of the body. The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) by smokers is not associated with greater rates of quitting cigarettes or reduced cigarette consumption after one year, says a recent study from the University of California, San Francisco. Researchers found that more women, younger adults and people with less education used e-cigarettes. E-cigarette use at baseline was not associated with quitting one year later or with a change in cigarette consumption, says the recent study.

In the study, "E-Cigarettes Not Associated With More Smokers Quitting, Reduced Consumption," published online March 24, 2014 in The JAMA Network Journals, according to the March 24, 2014 news release, "E-cigarettes not associated with more smokers quitting, reduced consumption," researchers found that more women, younger adults and people with less education used e-cigarettes. E-cigarette use at baseline was not associated with quitting one year later or with a change in cigarette consumption.

The authors acknowledge the low numbers of e-cigarette users in the study may have limited their ability to detect an association between e-cigarettes use and quitting, according to the recent study from the University of California, San Francisco, where researchers have found that the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) by smokers is not associated with greater rates of quitting cigarettes or reduced cigarette consumption after one year.

The authors acknowledge the low numbers of e-cigarette users in the study may have limited their ability to detect an association between e-cigarettes use and quitting. Author of the recent study, "E-Cigarettes Not Associated With More Smokers Quitting, Reduced Consumption," is Rachel A. Grana, Ph.D., M.P.H., and colleagues from the University California, San Francisco.

And in a related editor's note to the study, Mitchell H. Katz, M.D., a deputy editor of JAMA Internal Medicine, writes: "Unfortunately, the evidence on whether e-cigarettes help smokers to quit is contradictory and inconclusive. Grana and colleagues increase the weight of evidence indicating that e-cigarettes are not associated with higher rates of smoking cessation." You also may wish to see other "JAMA Internal Medicine Releases for March 24, 2014."

E-cigarettes are promoted as smoking cessation tools, but studies of their effectiveness have been unconvincing

The authors in the study published in The JAMA Network Journals analyzed self-reported data from 949 smokers (88 of the smokers used e-cigarettes at baseline) to determine whether e-cigarettes were associated with more successful quitting or reduced cigarette consumption.

"Nonetheless, our data add to the current evidence that e-cigarettes may not increase rates of smoking cessation. Regulations should prohibit advertising claiming or suggesting that e-cigarettes are effective smoking cessation devices until claims are supported by scientific evidence," the researchers explain, according to the March 24, 2014 news release, "E-cigarettes not associated with more smokers quitting, reduced consumption."

The wish of numerous researchers is that if only e-cigarettes were effective smoking cessation devices

Are they, really? Or do they simply draw in more youth to try smoking? After all, it's not chocolate cigarettes dangling from lips, it's liquid nicotine vapors, and nicotine is a neurotoxin and addictive, say numerous researchers.

People can buy the stimulant liquid nicotine online by the vial, gallon, or barrel, says the NY Times article. Liquid nicotine is extracted from tobacco and tinctured with a cocktail of flavorings, colorings and assorted chemicals to feed the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry. In the industry they're called e-liquids for e-cigarettes.

The neurotoxin, when absorbed through the skin can be lethal, with symptoms of vomiting and seizures

A teaspoon of the liquid even when highly diluted can kill a child. What's problematic as far as health trends is that the e-liquids at the present time are not regulated by the government, and neither are e-cigarettes regulated. They also can be legally sold in stores or online. Usually, the liquid comes in small bottles and is used to refill e-cigarettes.

Sure, the adds usually say you can take back your freedom with e-cigarettes, but that freedom to put neurotoxins in your body can be deadly. Who needs to get hooked on nicotine? For decades people have tried to dissuade kids from smoking as soon as they reached adolescence.

The future of e-cigarettes: Too many young children are attracted to the containers of liquid nicotine that can be fatal to them if absorbed by the skin or swallowed, even when diluted

Smokers’ bitter taste buds may be on the fritz

Could this be a reason why more intense tastes are appearing such as having more salt, sugar, and fat added to foods to make them taste more than flat? Bitterness can generally be tasted at very low concentrations, but not so for those who light up, according to a new study, "Differential perception of caffeine bitter taste depending on smoking status," recently published in the journal Chemosensory Perception. Authors are Jacob, N. et al (2014).

Smokers and those who have quit cannot fully appreciate the full flavor of a cup of coffee, because many cannot taste the bitterness of their regular caffeine kick. This is the finding of a study led by Nelly Jacob of the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital APHP in France, published in Springer’s journal Chemosensory Perception.

It's already known that smoking, and especially the toxic chemicals in tobacco, causes a loss of taste among smokers

It also causes structural changes to the fungiform papillae of the tongue where the taste buds are located. However, it is not yet known whether the full taste range returns to normal once a person quits smoking, or how long it takes.

To extend knowledge on the matter, Jacob and her colleagues therefore tested the ability of 451 staff from Parisian hospitals to recognize the four basic tastes of sweet, sour, bitter and salty, as well as the intensity of each taste. The participants were grouped into smokers, non-smokers and people who had quit smoking. The voluntary tests were conducted over the course of three consecutive “World No-Tobacco Days.”

Researchers found that smoking status had no influence on a person’s ability to recognize salty, sweet or sour tastes

It did however have an effect on people’s ability to taste the bitter taste of caffeine. The bitter receptors in the tongue are generally able to detect this taste in very low concentrations. However, one in every five smokers (19.8 percent) could not correctly recognize the taste, while the same happened one in every four times (26.5 percent) that former smokers were put to the test. Only 13.4 percent of non-smokers could not correctly identify the bitter samples they were asked to taste.

The researchers believe that the accumulation in the body of some tobacco or combustion products may hamper the regeneration of taste buds, and therefore still impair a person’s ability to recognize certain tastes even after they have stopped smoking.

“We consider that the perception of bitter taste should be examined more closely, both as a tool for smoking cessation or for preventing smoking initiation. More generally, it should be worthwhile to consider the role of chemosensory perceptions in smoking behavior.” says Jacob, according the March 24, 2014 news release, "Smokers' bitter taste buds may be on the fritz."

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