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Drudge Report guru starts a 'squawk' with his Twitter page

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During a slow Saturday night news cycle, the founder of the Drudge Report, Matt Drudge, captured national attention when he sent a message that conveyed to many that Americans are fast transforming a flock of warbling birdies into a nation of parrots, all polishing and pecking at the same stories. Matt's Twitter message was divided in three and finally four actions on his part, but in the end, as many reached for comprehension, the squawking began in earnest.

First Matt added a new tweet formatted to catch the eye: "In this manic digital age... It's vital... To clear your mind... Constantly..."

Then Matt deleted 99 tweets and added a new image of two parrots or lovebirds, doing what parrots do, one grooming another. If that wasn't enough to convey his message, as national news took notice, Drudge promoted major online news sites which published accounts of his deletion of his Twitter comments.

The headlines ironically illustrated what some consider Matt's alleged point by parroting one another, all a version of "Drudge deletes his tweets." FOX Nation and Mediate used identical headlines, "Drudge Deletes All his Tweets, Leaves One Mysterious Clue."

It has been noted that Drudge limited his Twitter page to 100 tweets, deleting tweets as new comments were added to keep the number consistent. Drudge's tweets are infamous for stirring controversy and sparking news headlines.

His tweets often touch on current political issues which mirror his Drudge Report page. However, a few personal comments sprinkled among them may mention a sunrise or music or a statement reflecting the demise of American culture, America's soul. This is the first time that Drudge has wiped his Twitter slate almost clean.

In the past, Drudge has suggested folks need to "unplug" as well as voiced his rage over privacy concerns. None of the major news reports have speculated whether or not Drudge will cease tweeting altogether, or perhaps limit his tweeting to a single comment from this point forward.

Online, it's a different story, lots of folks are squawking. General consensus seems to be that Drudge has wearied of the regurgitation of ideas and news. However some consider it a warning from Drudge that others should follow his example, for both their mental health and privacy concerns sparked by reports featured on the Drudge Report of government spying.

Over on John Galt's blog, he worries: "Is this the two-minute warning many of us have been concerned about? Did one of his insiders tip him off that the long anticipated crackdown on alternative media and those internet sites considered too radical for the norm to finally be suppressed and silenced?"

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