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Drudge blames 'cyberloafers' for dismal economy report: 'Get to work'

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Cyberloafers should stop their "barking" on the internet and "get to work," to save the economy, suggested the creator of the Drudge Report, Matt Drudge. His advice, followed a Wednesday Drudge Report headline that the United States economy drastically slowed during the last quarter.

Drudge tweeted, "Of course the American economy has stopped growing. All her citizens are busy online barking about who said what." In full caps, Drudge shouted his solution was that they should all "GET TO WORK."

It didn't take long for the irony of Drudge's statement to sink in on the Twittersphere. Many were quick to point out that Matt Drudge, whose Drudge Report site is the driver of more news than any news aggregation site online, is surely responsible for perpetuating a vast amount of the online political debate he was blasting.

A Twitter member couldn't resist reminding Drudge, "You are Matt Drudge." The member went on to add, "Your entire business model depends on these people."

It's unclear if Drudge was thinking of the hours workers spend browsing online, sapping productivity, when they should be working. A 2013 study estimated that "cyberloafing" while at work had huge risks in productivity because up to 80 percent of the time a worker spent online was wasted company time.

Some of the top ways that workers wasted company time online included viewing pornography, managing finances, watching videos, playing games, shopping, emailing, and engaging on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Job searching also made the list of activities.

Understanding the connection between productivity and economic growth is not all that hard, according to senior editor of the Acton Institute, Joe Carter. "Economic growth is, after all, a natural byproduct of productivity," he wrote in a blog post today about the economy.

Carter posits that America needs to create around 400,000 new jobs each month in order to stay even with the number of babies that are growing up and entering the labor market. Jobs must keep pace with births so that the economy can grow naturally.

Like Drudge, Carter believes it is vital that workers be engaged in productive labor which will keep companies in business, offer job security, and open up new businesses and new jobs. Only then can the economy "automatically grow as these laborers buy goods and services."

According to a report by the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) also linked on the Drudge Report, gross domestic products (GDP) barely showed up, growing only 0.1 percent in the first quarter. The GDP, "the broadest measure of goods and services produced across the economy " had the second weakest quarterly reading since the nearly five-year-old economic recovery of the great recession.

Although the severity of this report can't be denied, the WSJ quoted a warning from Richard Moody, chief economist at Regions Financial Corporation, to "take a deep breath." Don't panic.

Much of the GDP decline is being attributed to winter weather. With spring and sunny skies ahead, economists suggest the rest of the year should show growth.

Today, the Pew Research Center reveals that government and academic scholars have found a new reason for a surge in long-term unemployment numbers, not the weather, but "geography." The groups took into consideration whether a person had a car, had to rely on public transportation and the number of jobs available, at different pay levels with easy access compared to the number of people competing for those jobs.

So there you go. The ready excuse for the poor economy is "weather" and the brand new excuse for long term unemployment is "geography."

Contrasting Drudge's advice to get off the internet, Drudge earlier had admitted his dependence upon folks staying on the internet. He tweeted, "My biggest fear as editor of Drudge Report is people are slamming off all news and politics. Disgusted, frustrated and going off the grid."

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