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Dr. Oz talks extreme weight loss 'thigh gap' diets and magnesium energy boosters

You can never be too thin? Dr. Oz disagrees.
You can never be too thin? Dr. Oz disagrees.Getty Images

For several years, girls, teens and young women have been obsessed with achieving the newest slim sensation: Thigh Gaps. But their extreme weight loss plans can pose dangers, according to Dr. Mehmet Oz. On his Feb. 25 talk show, Dr. Oz explored thigh gap diets. Plus: Find out how to boost your energy with magnesium.

As an example of how these diets can become obsessive, Dr. Oz talked with Camille Hugh, author of "The Thigh Gap Hack: The Shortcut to Slimmer, Feminine Thighs Every Woman Secretly Desires" (click for details). Camille feels that her book does a service in offering tricks such as overcoming hunger, exercises and focusing primarily on very low calorie foods. She defended her desire to achieve the thigh gap look.

However, Dr. Oz is concerned that books and views such as Camille's can lead to eating disorders. He asked eating disorder specialist Dr. Jennifer Thomas to offer her insights.

Author of "Almost Anorexic: Is My (or My Loved One's) Relationship with Food a Problem? (The Almost Effect)," Dr. Thomas notes that Camille's emphasis on extreme weight loss and low body fat parallels the development of anorexia. By obsessing on those goals, young girls are at risk of developing eating disorders.

In addition to the emotional aspects of anorexia, girls focused on developing thigh gaps put their health at risk, warned Dr. Oz. They may lose muscle, which impacts the metabolism and even can affect the heart.

Note: This week is National Eating Disorders Week, designed to spread awareness: Learn more by clicking here. And find out about resources on eating disorders, from memoirs to DVDs to self-help guides, by clicking here.

Also on the show, Dr. Oz discussed magnesium for energy and health. Symptoms of insufficient magnesium include constipation, anxiety, fatigue and muscle spasms. Studies show that up to 75 percent of American adults lack enough magnesium.

To boost your magnesium levels, eat these foods:

  • kidney beans
  • black beans
  • brown rice
  • quinoa
  • bran cereal

Not into those foods? Dr. Oz also suggests taking a magnesium supplement. The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of magnesium for young adults is around 400 mg/day for men and 310 mg/day for women. If you're over 30, the RDA is 420 mg/day for men and 320 mg/day for women. Look for one without added ingredients, such as Nature Made High Potency Magnesium 400 mg (click for details).