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Dr. Oz: Toxic metals and chemicals found in organic foods, diet supplements

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Dr. Mehmet Oz spoke to a whistleblower who found poison in America's organic foods and supplements on the July 17 episode of the Dr. Oz Show.

Dr. Oz's guest was food activist Mike Adams, the editor of Natural News. While many people spend extra money to buy organic foods, Adams said some organic foods contain dangerous levels of toxic metals because the Food and Drug Administration does not regulate this at all.

"There is no limit to how much mercury, lead, cadmium, arsenic and aluminum is allowed in organic products," said Adams. "USDA organic standards place no limits on levels of heavy metals contamination of certified organic foods. There is no limit on the contamination of PCBs, BPA and other synthetic chemicals that’s allowed in certified organic foods, super-foods and supplements."

Shocking: Food Sold in USA Would Be Illegal to Sell in Canada

Mike said most U.S. food companies are not required to test for toxic metals, putting you and your family at risk for a variety of diseases, including cancer. Remarkably, Adams said most of the organic foods that are sold in the United States would be illegal to sell in Canada because they're tainted.

Adams and his forensic food lab at Natural News tested more than 1,000 products and found that rice protein powders, especially from China, contain heavy metals like tungsten. In addition, lead was found in cacao powders, copper was found in children's multivitamins, and lead was found in ginkgo biloba supplements. Natural News published its findings on its website.

China Is Worst Offender

Adams said the most egregious offender is China, whose record for food safety is atrocious. In December 2013, Dr. Oz examined the health dangers of processed chicken from China.

While the USDA insists the chickens will be processed under comparable health standards to those in the U.S., critics say China's lax factory oversight could make American consumers sick. In fact, China does not even have a food-safety board equivalent to the USDA or the FDA.

Since 2007, foods imported from China have raised safety concerns, including incidences of tainted baby formula, rat meat being sold as lamb, and the use of the chemical melamine (which is used to make floor tiles) in eggs and pet foods.

Earlier this year, China's chicken flocks suffered an outbreak of bird flu. And in March 2013, more than 11,000 dead pigs were found floating in a river in Shanghai. It was later revealed that overcrowding on farms was the cause of the rotting pig carcasses.

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