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Dog killed, children inside duplex raided by San Antonio PD June 20

Police shoot dog during drug raid
Police shoot dog during drug raid
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A family dog is dead, shot during a drug raid Friday afternoon in San Antonio, My San Antonio reported June 20.

San Antonio Police executed a search warrant June 20 at around 3:00 p.m. at a duplex in the 7200 block of Timbercreek Drive. According to spokesman Officer Douglas Greene, the department was investigating a report of drugs and weapons being inside the home.

Greene admitted no one inside the home was armed, although several weapons were recovered. Police allegedly announced their arrival before entering the home.

Neighbors reported hearing approximately 20 round being fired, and a window was shot out of the home. Police encountered a pit bull, and said they were forced to kill it. The dog was shot after officer's entered the back yard of the duplex, where children's toys were resting along the fence line.

Four young children were inside the home at the time of the raid, one of whom was still in diapers. Child Protective Services were called in to remove the children. Police refuse to verify the number of rounds fired during the raid or which officer fired a shot through a window.

What if a child had been hit by a stray bullet? Seeing toys in the yard should have led police to use caution in this case. The recent tragedy of a child critically injured by a flash grenade comes to mind.

Two adults were taken into custody, with at least one of the children belonging to one of those placed under arrest.

A stolen truck was recovered, along with a large quantity of marijuana, automatic weapons, rifles and handguns, and an unspecified amount of case.

Police are hoping more arrests will follow, based on information learned during this raid.

The fact that a dog had to die is sad. This is similar to a case several years ago which ended in a million dollar lawsuit being won for Hells Angels against the police departments who shot and killed three family dogs. The argument in that case is that the police department was negligent in not being prepared to handle any dogs they might encounter.

With the Hells Angels case, police were critisized because they had investigated suspects before the raid, and should have had a plan to deal with the dogs.

Will such a lawsuit stem from this latest incident? It depends on whether the family of the dog shot is willing to invest the time and energy necessary to take such a case to court.

Regardless of the reason for police to be at a residence, care should be taken when performing their job around children and family pets.

For more of Elisa's articles on dogs shot by police, click here.