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'Doctor Who': BBC edits beheading scene after ISIS videos

An episode of "Doctor Who" has been edited by BBC to delete a beheading scene, according to The Washington Post on Thursday. After ISIS terrorists executed another American journalist on video, BBC decided "out of respect" to take a similar scene out of Saturday's upcoming "Doctor Who" episode. BBC believed the scene would be potentially sensitive for some viewers.

Twelfth Doctor, Peter Capaldi, poses with his on-screen companion Jenna Coleman during a world tour to promote the new series of Doctor Who at Dendy Opera Quays on August 12, 2014 in Sydney, Australia.
Twelfth Doctor, Peter Capaldi, poses with his on-screen companion Jenna Coleman during a world tour to promote the new series of Doctor Who at Dendy Opera Quays on August 12, 2014 in Sydney, Australia.
Photo by Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images

On the "Doctor Who" third episode this weekend titled the "Robot of Sherwood," Robin Hood and the Sheriff of Nottingham take part in a scuffle that ultimately ends with a beheading. The decapitation portion of that scene was removed by BBC. The Hollywood Reporter posted a statement by BBC that says "In light of recent news events, we have made an edit to episode three out of respect."

The edit came after ISIS terrorists claimed credit for the murder of two U.S. journalists. ISIS released a video on Tuesday of the brutal killing of American journalist Steven Sotloff. This was the second video posted from the Islamic State that showed a beheading of an American. The first was of the murder of James Foley uploaded to YouTube on August 19.

Saturday's episode of "Doctor Who" with the twelfth Doctor, Peter Capaldi, was originally filmed in February, months before the ISIS beheadings. BBC is known for making edits to footage due to events in the news, including postponing the season finale of the series "Good Cop" in 2012 after two policewomen were killed. That episode reportedly included a scene where a female officer was violently attacked.

The deleted "Doctor Who" footage is reported to be several seconds long, and it's not certain how the removal of the scene will affect the outcome of the episode. Fans of "Doctor Who" are mostly understanding of BBC's decision to remove the scene, saying "it's a matter of timing" and "it's just too soon." Other fans would rather have the scene remain untouched. Said one disgruntled viewer, "Why does everything have to be so sensitive? These things aren't related."