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Did a mysterious 'unidentified object' shoot down the Russian Proton-M rocket?

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Did a mysterious 'unidentified object' shoot down the Russian Proton-M rocket? Russia's Proton-M rocket, carrying a powerful, advanced satellite onboard, burned up and "crashed down" outside of Kazakhstan's territory on Friday, May 16, about nine minutes after lift-off. A "tiny white object" was seen streaking in from the southeast and merging with the rocket just before it "deviated from its course." (See 25-30 secs into VIDEO 1.)

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What was that “tiny white dot”? Did "something unidentified" shoot down the Proton-M rocket? You be the judge of that.

The drama began about 9 minutes after liftoff, the 540th second of the flight to be exact.

A “tiny white dot” can be seen speeding in from the southeast corner of the screen and striking the Proton-M rocket mid-flight (about 25 to 30 sec in VIDEO 1 above), You’ll have to look closely at first to see the “tiny white dot,” but once you become aware of it, it is very hard to miss. Immediately after this contact, the rocket begins to deviate from its course and can be seen burning up in the atmosphere (VIDEO 2).

Was the Proton-M rocket struck by an “unidentified object”? Did something zoom in from the southeast and cause the Russian rocket to deviate from its trajectory and burn up in the atmosphere?

Stating the obvious, Oleg Dukhovnitsky, head of Russian Telecommunications Agency commented, “The satellite was ready to work. It’s the rocket that failed.”

According to Oleg Ostapenko, head of the Russian space agency, the failure occurred in one of the third stage’s steering engines. The launch “went bad” when emergency engines shutdown in response to the rocket deviating from its intended trajectory. The third stage, called Briz-M, was approximately 150 km above the ground at that moment with about 40 seconds to go before deploying its payload into the orbit.

In the VIDEO, a tiny white dot can clearly be seen zipping in from the southeast and striking the rocket "just before" the third-stage failure.

Timing is everything, isn't it!

This Proton-M rocket was said to be carrying an advanced Express-AM4R satellite. Ironically (or not), it is the same design as the Express-AM4, which was also lost in a failed launch in Aug 2011. Coincidence? Maybe.

The question remains, what was that mysterious tiny white dot that zipped in from the southwest and struck the Proton-M rocket just before it “deviated from its trajectory”? For now, let’s just call it an “unidentified flying object.”

Could someone or something be sending the Russians's a message to “keep boots on the ground?” What do you think it was?

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