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Deport Justin Bieber: Cops spill limo driver assault details as petition soars

Details about Justin Bieber's assault on a limo driver are emerging after Justin turned himself into Canadian authorities Wednesday. Bieber is being charged in Toronto with the equivalent of a misdemeanor in the U.S. for the alleged attack on the limo driver back in December, according to TMZ on Jan. 30.

Justin Bieber makes his way through a crazed Toronto crowd as he turned himself in to Canadian authorities Wednesday for allegedly assaulting a limo driver in December.
billboard.com/Getty Images

This coincidentally occurred just as a petition on website We The People soared past the required minimum number of signatures needed to urge the White House to deport him.

The new details Toronto police just released about the limo driver incident say Justin is being accused of bashing the driver in the back of the head.

Cops say the limo driver had picked up six passengers including Bieber at around 2:50 a.m. on Dec. 30. A fight broke out between the driver and "one of the passengers."

Police allege that passenger was Justin, who hit the limo driver in the back of the head "several times" during the fight. When the driver stopped to call the authorities, the pop star fled the scene.

Bieber was just arrested last week in Miami Beach and charged with drunken driving, resisting arrest and driving without a valid license after police claim they caught him drag racing.

Miami Beach Police Chief Raymond Martinez told reporters that the singer, "made some statements that he had consumed some alcohol, and that he had been smoking marijuana and consumed some prescription medication.", according to CNN.

Justin is still awaiting a decision by California officials about whether he'll be charged with felony vandalism for allegedly egging his Calabasas neighbor's house, causing $20,000 damage.

But it was the DUI in Florida that was the final straw that prompted the creation of the online petition to revoke Bieber's green card, essentially deporting him.

State Department spokesperson Jen Psaki said the petition program doesn't necessarily mean any specific action would be taken, but rather it's an opportunity the people of America's voices to be heard.

However, the terms of the program as stated on the White House website, say that if a petition meets the 100,000 signature threshold, "it will be reviewed by the administration and we will issue a response."

Immigration lawyers say convictions on the type of charges Bieber is facing generally don't lead to deportation. Justin's visa allows him to legally live in the United States due to his "extraordinary ability" in the arts.

And because these types of charges aren't considered to be aggravated felonies or crimes of moral turpitude, they don't rise to the level that federal law defines as grounds for deportation.

Further, federal law dictates that only violent crimes and sentences longer than a year result in any re-evaluation of an individual's visa status.

One competing petition created this past Saturday calls for keeping Justin in the U.S. That one gathered only about 1,800 signatures as of Jan. 29, and at this rate would need to accumulate over 98,000 more by the Feb. 24 deadline.

Meanwhile, as of Thursday morning, the deportation initiative ticked past 187,000 online signatures.

Is this a sign of the drastic fall from grace many predicted earlier in the teen's career?