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Crocheting with specialty yarns: Moonlight Mohair

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This is the first article in a series that will highlight specialty yarns from different manufacturers. Lion Brand has many specialty yarns. One of my favorites is Moonlight Mohair. This yarn is a blend of 57 percent acrylic, 28 percent mohair, 9 percent cotton, and 6 percent metallic thread. It is sold in 50 gram, 82 yard skeins. You can usually find it at retail craft chains, and sometimes you can get a great deal on a three-pack from Lion Brand’s website.

Breaking down the content

Almost everyone knows what acrylic is. This is a synthetic yarn. The acrylic in Moonlight Mohair gives stiffness to the yarn and helps to hold the two strands together. Next is mohair. This is an animal fiber, so the yarn is not vegan. Mohair comes from the angora goat—not to be confused with angora yarn which comes from an angora rabbit. The mohair gives the yarn fuzz and when crocheted into a project, the stitches will have a soft halo and provide warmth. Next on the list is cotton. In this particular yarn, the cotton is used as a base for the metallic thread. The metallics are wrapped around the cotton yarn.

Details

Moonlight Mohair has two strands of yarn. As you crochet, you have to be careful to catch both strands on every stitch. This is a bulky yarn—size 5. The skein recommends size K/10.5 or 6.55 mm crochet hook. I found a size L hook to work better. The skein says that you can machine wash this yarn in warm water. I would not risk this, the mohair is likely to felt and your project might shrink. Your project will last longer if you handwash it and lay it flat to dry. Do not use an iron on this yarn, the metallic threads will melt.

What to expect

This is not the type of yarn to use if you want to showcase intricate stitches. Stitching will have a soft halo. Simple stitches like single, double, or treble crochet work well. You might want to use a larger stitch for projects, because the yarn is a little pricey. Big stitches and chunky yarns make projects go quickly and reduce overall yarn costs. Yarn manufacturers are saying that chunky yarn is the fashion go-to for 2014.

Patterns

The yarn band for Moonlight Mohair yarn has a pattern for knit scarf done on the bias. For those who crochet, the Moonlight Mohair Scarf pattern found on Craftsy, is a free pattern that makes a wonderful scarf. This scarf is large enough to provide warmth and you can wrap it in a variety of ways. It is finished with fringe. It is a simple scarf pattern done in half-double crochet and edged in single crochet.

A search on Lion Brand’s website for crochet patterns featuring Moonlight Mohair yarn turned up very little. Most of the patterns called for yarns in addition to Moonlight Mohair that were discontinued. One pattern that looked promising was the Potato Chip Ruffled Scarf. This project can be done in a weekend. It uses a size K crochet hook and 4 skeins of yarn. The scarf is 60 inches long. This is another free pattern, but you have to register with Lion Brand with your email address and password in order to download the patterns.

Lynda Altman is a professional crafter and writer. She started crocheting as a young child. She crochets, quilts, sews, and creates beaded jewelry. Lynda loves vintage stitching samplers and enjoys counted cross stitch. You can find her work for sale on Etsy. She writes a crochet blog called The Granny Squared. You can contact her at the above link or on Twitter @fusgeyer.

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