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Cutty declined voting in election, state voter breakdown for ex-felons

Actor Chad L. Coleman attends a DVD signing of 'The WIre' at J&R Music World on December 13, 2007 in New York City.
Actor Chad L. Coleman attends a DVD signing of 'The WIre' at J&R Music World on December 13, 2007 in New York City.
Photo by Brad Barket/Getty Images

On Season 4's "Margin of Error" episode, one of the guys tried to hand out a voting brochure for the mayoral campaign with Tommy, Tony and Royce. Cutty was so busy trying to figure out why one of his boxers, Spider, ran away from him so he shooed away the next guy with brochures.

His response was he couldn't vote because he had a felony conviction (14 years for shooting and killing a man). But in the state of Baltimore, is it really true that felons can't vote?

According to American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), that's not necessarily true as long as his probationary period was over. By this episode, it's unclear whether he was still taking urine tests, but he was definitely not on house arrest judging from the amount of moms' homes he'd dipped in and out of.

In the state of Baltimore, voting rights are restored after the term of incarceration, parole and probation are all complete.

With midterm elections coming up, other voters may wonder if their states have the same laws. Here's a breakdown (source: FelonVoting.com):

Absentee voting allowed in prison: Maine, Vermont

Voting allowed after incarceration: D.C., Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Utah

Voting allowed after incarceration and parole: California, Colorado, Connecticut, New York

Voting allowed after incarceration, parole and probation: Alaska, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin

No voting for anyone with felony convictions: Alabama, Arizona, Delaware, Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee, Virginia, Wyoming

Shamontiel is the Scandal Examiner and the National African American Entertainment Examiner, too.

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