Skip to main content
  1. Life
  2. Health & Fitness
  3. Holistic Health

Coriander seeds: power beyond the mother plant

See also

For those not well-versed in herbal matters, whether culinary or medicinal, coriander is the product of the cilantro plant once it has gone to seed. Tiny green balls produced by the white flowers at the last stage of the herb’s growth, they eventually turn a subtle tan shade and can be either harvested or planted to ensure the next cilantro crop.

Should you choose to pick your cilantro plant’s seeds, don’t use them only for cooking and pickling as many people do. Popular in Indian menus as well as in all sorts of pickling spice packages, these little seeds are dynamic in all they can do for your body as natural medicine. Best of all, they don’t require you to go online for hours trying to sign up for any program that will cost you an arm and a leg more than you paid for the original cilantro plant.

Ayurvedic, Traditional Chinese Medicine, and even European healing traditions have cited use of coriander seeds for centuries. Among the conditions for which this herbal remedy is employed are a wide range of digestive complaints, from flatulence to diarrhea. Detoxification is another ailment for which coriander (as well as its mother cilantro plant’s leaves) has been found helpful. As well, this natural product has been credited by many as effective in treating salmonella food poisoning. Other types of contaminants in the body are also frequently said to be removed by use of these seeds.

For diabetics, coriander may be a stimulant to production of insulin, thereby helping lower blood glucose. With those suffering from elevated LDL cholesterol levels (the undesirable kind) it has been said to work on that problem efficiently.

Externally, made into a paste from ground coriander and water, some people have found it to be highly beneficial in combating hives and other skin rashes. For allergic reactions of other sorts, an infusion made from the seeds can have an antihistamine effect. It is known to soothe itchy skin taken either internally or externally.

As with plants in general, coriander contains fiber and phytonutrients, which are beneficial in any diet. As a source of both magnesium and iron, this seed is good for women of any age as well as for all those who use it in food. Additionally these seeds contain Vitamins A, C and K, plus folic acid, calcium and potassium. You can certainly get a lot of mileage out of such a miniature natural pharmacy.

Resist the temptation to uproot your cilantro once the leaves start to change to a smaller size, and it begins to flower. Surely the short wait for the seeds to appear will be worth it once you realize all the potential in this plant. At every stage of its growth, Coriandrum sativum will give you far more than its size indicates.

Advertisement

Life

  • Transgender cop
    A transgender police officer is stepping down from her position to run for office
    Video
    Political Office
  • Easter eggs
    Craft delicate, hand-painted eggs with flowers and other designs celebrating spring
    Camera
    Easter Eggs
  • Subway message
    Subway customer finds 'Big Mama' written on her order
    Video
    Subway Message
  • Working from home
    Working from home can be an exciting venture. Get tips to ensure productivity
    Camera
    Get Tips
  • Limes
    Rising cost of limes could be putting the squeeze on your favorite restaurant
    Expensive Limes
  • Pope Francis
    Religion: Pope Francis instructs how to fight against Satan
    Morning Mass

Related Videos:

  • Kendra Lynne
    <div class="video-info" data-id="516906324" data-param-name="playList" data-provider="5min" data-url="http://pshared.5min.com/Scripts/PlayerSeed.js?sid=1304&width=480&height=401&playList=516906324&autoStart=true"></div>
  • Oprah set a goal
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ZOy0YgUDwDg?VQ=HD720&amp;autoplay=1"></iframe>
  • What is fermented food
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TiigsFnNDuQ?VQ=HD720&amp;autoplay=1"></iframe>

User login

Log in
Sign in with your email and password. Or reset your password.
Write for us
Interested in becoming an Examiner and sharing your experience and passion? We're always looking for quality writers. Find out more about Examiner.com and apply today!