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Classic business: The 1964-65 New York World's Fair (and other info)

It was the third major world's fair to be held in New York City; the theme was “Peace Through Understanding”, which was symbolized by a 12-story high, stainless-steel model of the earth called the Unisphere.

This is an image of the 1964-1965 New York World's Fair on a postage stamp.
www.istockphoto.com by getty images

The fair had two sets of operating hours, each divided into six months: April 22 to Oct. 18, 1964 and April 21 to Oct. 17, 1965. Admission prices were $2.00 for adults (equivalent to $15 today), 13 and up in 1964, with an increase to $2.50 in 1965. There was a $1.00 fee for children (equivalent to $7.00 today) for children, ages 2 to 12, for both years.

It was this particular fair that gave many visitors their first interaction with computer equipment (by IBM) of the time (mainframes, terminals with keyboards, CRT displays, punch cards and phone modems).
And it was also at this fair that the Ford Mustang (a future car classic), color TV (black-and-white TV debuted at the 1939 New York World's Fair) and the picturephone (40 years before Skype (!) and before videoconferencing; Truly ahead of its time, it didn't catch on due to the high price and small picture) were introduced to the public.

In what was considered very “cutting-edge” and “state of the art” were Walt Disney'sAudio-Animatronics” (this was a combination of computers and electromechanical actuators that controlled the movement of lifelike robots). “It's a Small World (After All)” was the most famous of the four Disney exhibits. The technology developed for “Small World” and the other exhibits were later used to the “Pirates of the Caribbean” attraction.

And an amazing feat of design and engineering debuted at the Port Authority Building-a model of the World Trade Center-the Twin Towers (initially disliked by the critics).

Did You Know That.....

Walt Disney World tickets have become pricier?
It's now $99 (before taxes!) for visitors over age 9.
Single-day tickets for Epcot, Disney's Hollywood Studios and Animal Kingdom are now $94 for visitors over age 9.
For children under age 10, it'll cost $93 for the Magic Kingdom and $88 to attend the other attractions (there are multiday tickets available, which are much cheaper).
According to Disney spokesperson Kim Prunty, the high prices are due to the parks' high quality.

Sources: Parade magazine, January 5, 2014, www.parade.com/world and “Tomorrowland” by Joseph Tirella and “Travel Digest”-Combined dispatches-The (Sunday) Vindicator, March 2, 2014