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Christian Church/Church of Christ Dictionary: 'G' is for 'God''

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One of the best explanations of God appears in the movie "Rudy"as a Catholic priest is counseling the title character in the sanctuary of a church.

Rudy Ruettiger is desperate to get into Notre Dame and play football for the Fighting Irish. Here is a transcript of their conversation.

Father Cavanaugh: “Taking your appeal to a higher authority?”
Rudy: “I'm desperate. If I don't get in next semester, it's over. Notre Dame doesn't accept senior transfers.”
Father Cavanaugh: “Well, you've done a hell of a job kid, chasing down your dream.”
Rudy: “Who cares what kind of job I did if it doesn't produce results? It doesn't mean anything.”
Father Cavanaugh: “I think you'll find that it will.”
Rudy: “Maybe I haven't prayed enough.”
Father Cavanaugh: “I don't think that's the problem. Praying is something we do in our time. The answers come in God's time.”
Rudy: “If I've done everything I possibly can, can you help me?”
Father Cavanaugh: “Son, in thirty-five years of religious study, I've come up with only two hard, incontrovertible facts; there is a God, and I'm not Him.”

The scene offers some telltale evidence about a person's relationship with God. For example, did you notice that Rudy goes to the place where he can make his appeal to God? It shows that Rudy is a person of faith who knows how to humbly seek God's favor.

We should also consider Rudy's state of mind. He is desperate because his dream is to play football at the University of Notre Dame. Rudy believes he's done all he can do, so doesn't it seem logical to appeal to a God who can do the miraculous?

His desperation turns into feelings of inadequacy, when Rudy says the effort is worthless if it does not produce results. Isn't it interesting that our faith sometimes hinges on what we perceive should be the results of our actions?

Father Cavanaugh reinforces this message when he explains to Rudy that God does hear our prayers, but "praying is something we do in our time. The answers come in God's time."

When we call into question God's timing, it begins to take on an unpleasant tone as if we have the roles reversed. We are seeking to subject God to our will. I readily confess it is a road that you should not travel down.

The end of the conversation serves as a reminder that none of us are God. From the most faithful of priests to a young man pursuing a football dream, we all most acknowledge the authority, divinity and power of almighty God. We must always remember that wen the weight of our sin became too great, God provided the greatest gift of love to all humanity.

“16 For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. 17 For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him.” (John 3:16-17, New International Version of The Bible)

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