Skip to main content

See also:

Chris Christie Exchanged 9-11 Wreckage for Endorsements

Bill Baroni presents a piece of steel from the World Trade Center to the mayor of Secaucus, NJ
Bill Baroni presents a piece of steel from the World Trade Center to the mayor of Secaucus, NJBill Baroni presents a piece of steel from the World Trade Center to the mayor of Secaucus, NJ

The New York Times reported Tuesday that Bill Baroni, Chris Christie’s top appointee at the Port Authority, exchanged artifacts from the Twin Towers as politically motivated gifts in an effort to get New Jersey mayors to endorse Chris Christie in the election last year.

The pieces of the twisted and mangled heavy grade steel beams from the World Trade Center are in great demand. Cities from around the world have applied to obtain a piece of the World Trade Center wreckage to use as the centerpiece of their 9-11 memorials.

Outside of the United States, London has the largest piece of steel from the World Trade Center, and it is the centerpiece of the London 9-11 Memorial.

Austin, Texas received a piece of steel from the World Trade Center to display in the 9-11 Memorial at the Austin State Cemetery.

Because the World Trade Center was owned by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the Port Authority controlled the disposition of the steel beams and other wreckage

MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow reported last night that all of the artifacts from the World Trade Center are stored in Hanger #17 at New York City John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) in Queens.

To ensure that these sacred artifacts would be used in an appropriate manner, the Port Authority established a vigorous and lengthy application process, managed by career employees of the Port Authority.

Prior to Baroni’s appointment by Christie to be the deputy executive director of the Port Authority, any city or town that wanted to obtain a piece of the World Trade Center wreckage had to apply and go through a long, detailed, time-consuming process to prove to the Port Authority that they should get a piece of the wreckage.

Baroni changed all that, but only for the State of New Jersey. Every other place else in the entire world still had to go through the long detailed process, designed to protect the sacred nature of the relics of the 9-11 attack on the Twin Towers.

But all Mayors of New Jersey towns had to do was get Bill Baroni’s approval; and Baroni used that approval power to get the Mayors to endorse Chris Christie’s re-election campaign in exchange for a piece of steel from the World Trade Center.

Corruption has its own motivations, and one has to thoroughly study that phenomenon and eliminate the foundations that allow corruption to exist.
Eduard Shevardnadze

During Chris Christie re-election campaign, Christie’s staff created a list of the top 100 Mayors of towns in New Jersey whose endorsements Chris Christie wanted to secure during his re-election campaign.

Baroni used his position as the deputy executive director of the Port Authority, to bribe New Jersey Mayors into endorsing Christie in exchange for pieces of steel from the World Trade Center that they could use for their own local 9-11 Memorial.

According to the New York Times, Baroni, as deputy executive director of the Port Authority, presented pieces of steel from the ruins of the World Trade Center to 20 carefully chosen New Jersey mayors whose names were at the top of that list of the 100 Mayors whose endorsements Chris Christie wanted to get.

According the New York Times, “Baroni, often accompanied by Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno, one of Mr. Christie’s top aides, delivered the World Trade Center steel to communities like Secaucus and Tenafly where the campaign sought endorsements.”

Deborah L. Gramiccioni, who replaced Baroni as the deputy executive director of the Port Authority, has announced that she has cancelled Baroni’s policy, and from now on the towns in New Jersey will have to go through the same process as every other town or city that wants to obtain a piece of the World Trade Center wreckage for use in a 9-11 Memorial.