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Chris Brown sentenced to jail after admitting to probation violation

Singer Chris Brown, who fell from public favor after he pleaded guilty to beating up former girlfriend Rihanna in 2009, was sentenced to jail on May 9 for a probation violation stemming from an assault charge in Washington where he punched and broke the nose of a man trying to take his picture. Brown has been under court ordered supervision since his felony assault on Rihanna and had his probation revoked after his arrest on that more recent Washington assault charge.

Lawyer Mark Geragos hopes that his client will be free this week though.
Lawyer Mark Geragos hopes that his client will be free this week though.
Paul Buck-Pool/Getty Images

CNN reported last night that since Brown admitted to a probation violation in that Washington altercation, the singer might now be free from jail sooner than later. Brown appeared in a Los Angeles courtroom yesterday sporting handcuffs and his orange prison jumpsuit, and believes the end of his jail time is drawing near.

Brown has been incarcerated for the last two months, and invested five months in a court ordered rahab facility prior to that. After admitting to his probation violation, the judge "immediately sentenced Brown to serve 365 days in jail for the admitted probation violation.” Brown was also given credit for the combination of 234 days already spent in jail and rehab – leaving him with a 131 day jail sentence imposed by Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge James Brandlin yesterday.

Brown's high profile lawyer, Mark Geragos, believes that his client will be back on the streets in the next few days.

"I would expect that Chris should be out of jail before the weekend's up or before Monday," Geragos said after the hearing. "If he isn't out by Monday, then I would expect he's getting special treatment. He's got over 230 days credit on a 365 (day sentence) and generally the sheriff is releasing on a lot less than that."

Brown still won’t be totally free and clear from his legal obligations though. He still has to serve approximately 700 hours of court imposed community service. Once he’s free from prison, he’ll be completing that service at the rate of three days every week, a service that Brown actually enjoys. According to Geragos, Brown has an appreciation for his community labor because it’s "at a facility that has allowed to him to kind of expand his horizons."

MSN quoted Geragos as saying "We're gratified that he was not sentenced to state prison, gratified that he's still on probation."

"I think that Chris has learned quite a bit through this experience and I'm anxious to see how he does, as I think everybody else is."