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Cherry: Medical foster needed until August 6 for CIRD dog at upstate shelter

Cherry
CherryFacebook: Greenville County Pet Rescue

Update August safe album

According to Facebook: Greenville County Pet Rescue, this beauty is running out of time at the high-kill upstate shelter. More information can be found on this Facebook thread.

The shelter in Greenville, South Carolina is full. This sweet baby needs a foster until at least August 6. Cherry has canine infectious respiratory disease and can't remain at the shelter. He also has demodex.

Cherry 23176897 male 4 months 2 lb foster till 8/6 (for canine infectious respiratory disease) or longer also has demodex

Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is a complex infection that occurs worldwide predominantly in kennelled dogs, and several bacterial and viral micro-organisms have been associated with outbreaks of CIRD

If you can find it in your heart to save this baby, even for a short fostering period, please contact Greenville County Animal Care Services by email at petrescue@greenvillecounty.org. Be sure to put the pet name and ID in the subject line of your email.

Please share this article with friends in rescue, foster or who are looking to adopt a special pet. Social media has saved millions of shelter pets. Let's do our part to be sure this baby gets the chance at a forever home.

Greenville County Pet Rescue on Facebook does an excellent job in listing dogs and cats in their care. Not only does the shelter take in strays and owner surrenders from the Greenville area, they also take in cats and dogs brought in by Spartanburg.

Greenville County Animal Care Services isn't allowed to turn an animal away for lack of space. This alone puts a cat or dog in danger, especially if it's an owner surrender, meaning the holding period as required by law doesn't apply.

The total number of dogs and cats taken into their facility runs around 20,000 per year. The heaviest turn-in period for cats is during kitten season.

When the shelter is full, dogs and cats may die, simply for lack of room to house them until a rescue or adoption can take place. It doesn't matter what age, as even puppies and kittens are at risk of being killed when there's nowhere to put them.

You can be part of the solution by having your cat or dog spayed or neutered, or by adopting from the shelter.

Not sure whether you want the responsibility of a pet? Then apply to foster a deserving dog or cat until a forever home can be found. Contact the shelter for more information on their foster programs.