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Celebrating the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday

What will you do to celebrate the King Holiday?  What will you do to celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.?

Dr. King said, “Everybody can be great, because everybody can serve.” The central theme for this year’s King Holiday is “A Day On, Not a Day Off.” You and your friends and family can participate in a day of service in order to honor the life and legacy of Dr. King. Click to sign up to participate in your area.

Around town, McCormick Theological Seminary will host a community celebration on January 15 at 6:30pm with Bishop Yvette Flunder, acclaimed preacher and HIV/AIDS leader will be the featured speaker. Flunder is pastor of City of Refuge United Church of Christ in San Francisco. Trinity United Church of Christ’s Imani Ya Watume Choir and Progressive Community Center’s Liturgical Dance ministry will share in the celebration. The event is free and open to the public at 1100 E. 55th Street in Hyde Park, Chicago.

January 16,  Chicago Cares will host a Day of Service mobilizing over 3000 volunteers for service throughout the city of Chicago.   On Sunday, January 17 at 11:15am service, The Faith Community of St. Sabina will celebrate Dr. King’s life with speaker Rev. Samuel “Billy” Kyles, who was an eyewitness to King’s assassination and the last living person to have shared the last hour of Dr. King’s life.  Wicker Park Grace will celebrate Dr. King's life and legacy at their 5pm community gathering.

First Church of the Brethren will host a special King Holiday service with The Esperanza Church and Community Mennonite Church on January 17. The church was one of two places in Chicago that Dr. King had his office when he served in Chicago in 1966. He preached often at the church where he spoke about anti-racism issues and open housing. He was affiliated in Chicago with the Campaign to End Slum Housing.

Rev. Irene Pak, McCormick Alum 2007 and Associate Pastor at Daesung Presbyterian Church in Sunnyvale, California reflects on Dr. King this week and prepares for Dr. King Day services. “We must continue to create awareness and not become complacent to the injustices we see and do not see. My prayer is that we can act out of the overflowing love and grace that we have received. The truth is, whether we want to acknowledge it or not, we still have to journey toward reconciliation.”

“The work is not yet done,” says Priscilla Rodriguez, Coordinator of McCormick Theological Seminary’s
Center for Latin@ Theology and Ministry and the Center for African American Ministry and Black Church Studies. “We give thanks for all the people who worked for all our rights. We must continue.”

So, what will you do to celebrate the Dr. King Holiday.  Stay tuned here for photo updates on Chicago celebrations of Dr. King.

Comments

  • RevL 4 years ago

    So, what will you do to celebrate King Holiday. Let us know. We want to hear. Also, tell us, what does Dr. King's life and legacy mean to you. What is the meaning for our times? Speak to me Global Community. Blessings and Peace, RevL

  • JoAnne M Terrell 4 years ago

    I will think of the great souled man on the occasion of his birth. I will also attend several lectures and sermons given in his honor over the weekend and Monday. Moreover, I will continue examining myself to see whether I am contributing as much as I possibly can to the Beloved Community/City of Friends in Haiti and my immediate environs.

  • RevL 4 years ago

    Thank you, Dr. Terrell. So I ask everyone, what does Dr. King's legacy mean to you right now for these times in light of the Haiti Crisis. Speak to us here. Thanks so much!

  • Sandhya Jha 4 years ago

    In 2005, there was a picture on the cover of the New York Times. A woman had made "bread" out of flour, mud and straw. I think Dr. King would be outraged that people have been starving and dying due to systemic oppression and it took a natural disaster for us to pay attention. Today what I think that means for those of us fighting for justice is that we don't disappear once the rubble has cleared, and we nurture and support the Haitian people in their struggle for justice and dignity and food on a day-to-day basis.

  • tina 4 years ago

    Is Dr.King brthday a government holiday?
    /

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