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Catch those hard to reach fish – the MicroWave line control difference

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Walking the isles of the recent News Channel 8 Outdoors Expo & Boat Show in Tampa led me to Captain Joe’s Fishing Booth and a re-introduction to Seeker Rods and the MicroWave Line Control System from American Tackle.

Manning the booth was Seeker Rods and Aqua Dream Pro Staffer, Brandon Wood. Brandon was offering the MicroWave Challenge to show attendees by allowing them to cast two different rods, one with the MicroWave System and one with conventional guides.

He first explained the two rods to be used in the challenge. “ This is your typical rod guide system,” said Brandon. “Same blank, same reel, same line, same lure. Every thing is the same on this rod except the guide system. On a typical rod, when you make a cast, the line comes off the reel in loops or spirals.“ He went on to explain that the line hits the first guide and the loops continue through the guides until the last one is reached. The line is hitting the guides as it spirals outward. The friction caused by that line contact with the guides shortens the cast. The friction slows down lure speed and line speed.

The second rod was a Capt. Mike Hakala signature series rod from Seeker Rods. The only difference between it and the conventional rod was that it was equipped with the MicroWave Line Control System.

After the explanation Brandon had me cast a conventional outfit with conventional line guides. He instructs to make a nice easy cast, not to force it and not to go for the longest cast I can. “You want to feel for the vibration. You will actually feel the line hitting every one of your guides. What you are feeling is friction.”

Every thing he said was true. You can feel the vibration of the line hitting the guides, causing the friction he described. Nevertheless, I made a decent cast.

Next he handed me the same exact outfit except with the MicroWave System. It was the same length rod, same reel, same everything except the guides. Directing my attention to the first guide, he points out the difference.

There is a small inset guide inside the first larger guide. The purpose of the first guide with its smaller inset is to arrest all those loops that would normally start their journey to the end of the rod. “When you make a cast, from the first guide forward your line will be straight, your friction will be reduced as a straight line exits the remainder of the guides. Lure speed increases, line speed increases and your casts are longer.”

So, I endeavored to duplicate my cast made earlier with the conventionally equipped rod. The result was a noticeably smoother cast and a relatively longer cast. It took no more effort to propel the lure a further distance using the rod equipped with the MicroWave system.

Longer smoother casts are not all you get with the Seeker Rod from Aqua Dream. “Not only do you obtain longer casts,” says Brandon, “you also control wind knots. You don’t have all those loops that make it possible for wind knots to occur. With so many anglers going to the thinner diameter braided lines, wind knots are an issue on windy days. The guides can’t solve every issue, because some relate to technique, but as far as casting, the average person will add 15 to 20 feet to their cast, however they do it.”

Brandon says there is a short learning curve to perfecting the cast with the MicroWave system, but it is simple and mostly relates to easing up and making smooth non-forced casts. “Take your time, cast 10 to 15 times, and I promise you will get better and cast further!”

After casting both rods and comparing them side-by-side, I have to agree. This new technology makes it possible to get longer smoother casts without doing anything except changing equipment. These rods could make the difference in catching those hard to reach, sometimes spooky, fish on the flats.

For more information on Capt. Mikes Aqua Dream products, including the Seeker Rods, visit his website at http://www.aquadreamliving.com.

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