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Can America govern?

Empty of capacity to govern
Empty of capacity to governJames George

America is running on empty of capacity to govern. A nation divided against itself cannot stand. How is America doing today? Well, it is divided against itself. Republicans are divided against themselves and against everyone else. That makes for dysfunctional governance. Democrats may be more united, as a party, but, their apparent lack of competence at governing makes them suspicious to voters.

The reason why American government remains in disarray has to do with fundamentals:

  1. Democracy has been corrupted by special interests that are permitted to make unlimited campaign contributions as if they are individuals. That undermines American equality.
  2. Economic inequity prevails and the divide between extremely wealthy persons and poor is exacerbated with the collapse of America’s middle class. That is the result from an unsustainable economic model.
  3. The president, political parties, and incumbent elected representatives are not managing government enterprise competently because they have deficient qualifications: skill, knowledge, experience and proficiency to address the nation’s considerable needs.

A midterm election that empowers Republicans with control of both chambers of Congress will not produce better government. Republicans have a terrible track record in recent history, and if you look at history, who was the last great Republican president? In historical perspective, how does history rate Ronald Reagan, for instance?

Reagan ended the Cold War, but his economic policies failed miserably.

“At the end of two terms in office, President Ronald Reagan left his legacy, the Reagan Revolution (Reaganomics = or supply-side economics). In Reagan's words, "government is the problem." His economic policies were intended to reinvigorate the American people and reduce their reliance on government entitlements. He believed he had fulfilled his campaign pledge of 1980 to restore "the great, confident roar of American progress and growth and optimism." However, many argue that Reagan's finest achievement was to engineer the West's victory in the Cold War.”

http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1958.html

Dan Balz at the Washington Post describes how Republicans are shooting themselves in the foot before taking a summer recess. They would rather sue the President than to legislate. That will appear frivolous to most voters.

Where Ronald Reagan was indisputably a patriot, voters can’t say that about most incumbent Republicans. Aside from Hawks, Senator McCain and Lindsey Graham, what have they got? Speaker Boehner’s credentials are incredibly weak. (Boehner enlisted in the Navy during the Vietnam war but was discharged for a bad back, that did not prevent him from playing a fine round of golf later on.) Mitch McConnell is a professional politician whose credentials are woefully out of date.

“Republicans deliver another self-inflicted wound

By Dan Balz Chief correspondent July 31 at 3:43 PM

Republicans may yet win the elections in November. They may end up in control of both houses of Congress come January. But in the final week before a lengthy August recess, they have shown a remarkable capacity to complicate their path to victory.

The latest blow came Thursday in what has become predictable fashion: chaos in the House. Amid fractious infighting, House leaders abruptly pulled their alternative to President Obama’s bill to deal with the influx of Central American children crossing the border. What was said to be a national crisis turned into one more problem facing deferral.
But there was more over the week that could contribute to the deteriorated brand called the Republican Party. On Wednesday, the House voted to sue Obama, an action that may cheer the party’s conservative wing but that also may appear to other voters to be a distraction at a time of major domestic and international problems.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/republicans-deliver-another-self-inflicted-wound/2014/07/31/d78f131a-18e5-11e4-9e3b-7f2f110c6265_story.html